Laurel Peltier

Laurel Peltier writes the environment GreenLaurel column every Thursday in the Baltimore Fishbowl.

Greenlaurel: ’Unprecedented recovery’ in Chesapeake Bay’s sea grasses directly tied to clean-up efforts

Sea grasses in the Chesapeake Bay. Photo credit: Jon LefCheck, via UMCES.

A first-of-its-kind study has revealed that the decades-long “Save the Bay” effort is working. Underwater sea grasses, vital to the bay’s ecosystem, are at their highest levels in nearly 50 years. Not only is this good news for the Chesapeake Bay, but the research provides hope for other impaired estuaries, proving that a coordinated government collaboration focused on reducing pollution can lead to real restoration.

Greenlaurel: Camp Small, once a costly pile, is now a buzzing, zero-waste wood-salvaging initiative

These 20-foot-high piles of wood are just a fraction of Camp Small’s inventory. Photo by Laurel Peltier.

Have you ever noticed that massive wood pile when you drive southbound on I-83, between the Northern Parkway and Cold Spring Lane exits? That “wood dump,” if you will, is actually Baltimore’s Camp Small Zero Waste Initiative, a vital supply of home-grown timber, mulch and firewood logs for the city. And what’s more, those money-making logs are sitting atop some interesting Civil War history.

Greenlaurel: Baltimore-Based Scientists Answer Common Climate Change Questions

Screenshot from @realDonaldTrump’s Twitter account

Climate change was a confusing topic long before President Trump began weighing in online, so we used our phone-a-friend lifeline to ask Baltimore’s scientists to get some answers to common questions about global warming.

Greenlaurel: Tackling Trump’s Environmental Mess, Maryland Legislators Propose Important Eco-Bills in 2018


In one short year, Trump has reversed more than 60 federal environmental regulations. The gutting of federal green regulations makes state-level environmental legislation proposed in this year’s Maryland General Assembly session that much more critical.

Greenlaurel: A Step-By-Step Guide to Making a Smart Electricity Supply Choice in Maryland


To help you navigate Maryland’s deregulated — and frankly, confusing — energy supplier marketplace, we called on the experts to offer their practical tips to help you make energy deregulation work for your household. Grab your BGE bill, paper and pencil, and a calculator would’t hurt, too.

Greenlaurel: Eco-Friendly Tips for Keeping Your Walkways Ice-Free this Winter

Maryland’s waterways and drinking reservoirs exhibit higher levels of chloride due to the continued use of road salt.

Homeowners can use simple de-icing choices, along with a few tricks, to keep sidewalks and driveways safe while also mitigating harm to plants, pets and waterways.

Greenlaurel: An Updated Guide on How to Donate or Recycle ANYTHING in Baltimore


If you’re downsizing or decluttering, you may have amassed a collection of stuff that you’d rather donate or recycle somewhere locally than send to the landfill. We’ve done the legwork for you below in our updated guide.

Greenlaurel: An Eco-Friendly Paint Pick-Up Service For That ‘Collection’ In Your Garage

Old Paint collected from a residence. Fun painting parties in the 1960s? Photo credit: Lawrence Cheng

Raea Jean Leinster, a decorative painter in the D.C. area, ran into a problem over time that most homeowners face: How do you properly dispose of unused latex paint?

Greenlaurel: Baltimore’s Industrial ‘Yuck’ is Seeping into Our Waterways (and Possibly Our People)

Scrap metal left out in the elements can leach toxic metals that flow in rain runoff to waterways. Photo via Wikimedia Commons.

A share of Maryland’s stormwater pollution problem comes from unchecked, sky-high amounts of toxic yuck washed away from Baltimore’s industrial junkyards, landfills and businesses, according to some new investigative research from two nonprofit groups.

Greenlaurel: Carver Vo-Tech Students Build Wood Sculpture for Druid Hill Park’s ‘Nature Play Space’

Carver Vo-Tech seniors Marc Bostic and Keyashia Holt, juniors Jason Turnage and Levi Davis, and their teacher, Greg McDevitt, show off their new wood sculpture.

Using natural elements like downed trees, logs and willow branch tunnels, so-called nature play spaces parks are a new trend in playgrounds — and Baltimore has joined the movement.