Columns

Hot Plate: Donut Stop Believin’ at Waverly, Metropolitan Wine Bar Closing, Christmas Plans

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Donut Stop Believin’ Pop-up will pop up at the Waverly farmers’ market tomorrow –
and will donate all proceeds to Moveable Feast. Photo courtesy of Doug Wetzel.

With Christmas upon us, this week is both festive and calm, with a flurry of special dinners scheduled for the holiday, then a quiet week from Tuesday on. Here’s a look at what Baltimore’s restaurants have on tap for the holiday week:

Greenlaurel: Eco-Friendly Tips for Keeping Your Walkways Ice-Free this Winter

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Maryland’s waterways and drinking reservoirs exhibit higher levels of chloride due to the continued use of road salt.

Homeowners can use simple de-icing choices, along with a few tricks, to keep sidewalks and driveways safe while also mitigating harm to plants, pets and waterways.

Greenlaurel: An Updated Guide on How to Donate or Recycle ANYTHING in Baltimore

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If you’re downsizing or decluttering, you may have amassed a collection of stuff that you’d rather donate or recycle somewhere locally than send to the landfill. We’ve done the legwork for you below in our updated guide.

Hot Plate: Holiday Markets at Dylan’s & Bird in Hand, Pancakes at Gertrude’s, Christmas Eve Dining Options

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Fans of the Feast of Seven Fishes have several options around Baltimore this year, including Gnocco, which will serve its feast on Saturday, Dec. 23.

It’s the most wonderful time of the year…for dining out. Whether you have last minute shopping to do or you just need a break from wrapping gifts, local restaurants offer plenty of reasons to visit this week.

Hot Plate: Holiday Markets, Foraged to Open in Hampden, Vietnamese at Salt

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Woodberry Kitchen’s holiday market is open in the restaurant during weekdays from now through Dec. 29. Photo credit: Shannon Patrick

The holiday season is in full swing this week, with tons of opportunities to shop for food-related gifts – and to eat – all over town. Here’s a look at what’s happening:

Greenlaurel: An Eco-Friendly Paint Pick-Up Service For That ‘Collection’ In Your Garage

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Old Paint collected from a residence. Fun painting parties in the 1960s? Photo credit: Lawrence Cheng

Raea Jean Leinster, a decorative painter in the D.C. area, ran into a problem over time that most homeowners face: How do you properly dispose of unused latex paint?

Hook, Line, and Sinker: How the Phishermen Reeled Me In

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I’ve been reluctant to tell the story below: it’s too embarrassing, even for a blurter like me. However, I just read that one of the secondary dangers of being scammed is that the victim feels so much shame about falling for the con that they are unwilling to talk about it, leading to depression and PTSD. So spill I shall.

This Blind Man’s Life

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University of Baltimore student Matt Harris is almost totally blind and partially deaf, and yet he attends his college classes, earns good grades, parents two young women, and finds a reason (almost) never to complain. Is he superhuman, insane or somehow wiser than most? Read on.

“What’s up Mattiac,” my neighbor answered, calling me by the nickname she had given me.

“Well. I have good news and bad news,” I said into my cell. “First, the bad. I ran over your son’s shoes with my lawnmower. The good news is his feet weren’t in them.”

Hot Plate: Tooloulou Closes, Emma’s Tea Spot Opens, Miracle on Magothy Beach Spreads Holiday Cheer

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The Muletide is one of many holiday-themed drinks available at Miracle on Magothy Beach, a Christmassy pop-up at Mutiny Pirate Bar.

The holiday season kicks into gear this week in Baltimore, with restaurants hosting festive events throughout the week. Here’s a look at what’s happening in and around town:

Greenlaurel: Baltimore’s Industrial ‘Yuck’ is Seeping into Our Waterways (and Possibly Our People)

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Scrap metal left out in the elements can leach toxic metals that flow in rain runoff to waterways. Photo via Wikimedia Commons.

A share of Maryland’s stormwater pollution problem comes from unchecked, sky-high amounts of toxic yuck washed away from Baltimore’s industrial junkyards, landfills and businesses, according to some new investigative research from two nonprofit groups.