Hot House: Laurence Fowler’s Handsome Tudor Masterpiece Asks $2.275M

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Hot House: 33 Warrenton Road, Baltimore 21218

Tudor mansion in brick and stone, circa 1919, with slate roof, limestone casements, leaded glass windows. Renovated and in excellent condition. Eight bedrooms, six full and two half baths over 7,816 sq. ft. Grand paneled entrance hall, oak library, covered porch, Trish Houck-designed gourmet chef’s kitchen with butler’s pantry, breakfast room with arched doors to terrace. Banquet-size dining room. Multiple fireplaces, abundant natural light.  Arcade enclosed oak stairway rises to deep bay window seat at landing.  Large master bedroom with ensuite marble bath, dressing room, sitting room. Picturesque grounds with specimen trees, hedgerows, stonework. Central air. Heated two-car garage: $2,275,000

What: “O, To be in England…”   In the world of real estate, the phrase “English country house” is tossed off pretty indiscriminately.  But this house, seriously — with its private, park-like setting, old trees, hedgerows, boxwood, roses —evokes nothing as much as an English country estate. Like, you are there.

Built by society architect Laurence Fowler for H.C. Black — publisher of the Baltimore Sun, Chairman of the H.S. Abell Company, and founder, in 1953, of the Abell Foundation — it incorporates the finest materials of its time and an incredible amount of workmanship. Solid oak paneling, oak floors, carved fireplace mantels. You may not want the wall-to-wall carpet upstairs, or the teal kitchen cabinets, but anyone with an ounce of romance will adore this place. Bathrooms and kitchen are all modernized, but the hinged casement windows with their panes of leaded glass evoke merry olde England, as do the views of the sweeping lawn. Perhaps some sheep …

Where: In Guilford west of Charles Street, on the Tuscany-Canterbury side, that somewhat mysterious neighborhood around the Ambassador restaurant and Calvert School. Lots of distinctive Tudor-style homes and pre-war apartments. On the doorstep of Johns Hopkins University, and a short walk to Charles Village.

Why: Says you’ve arrived, for sure.

Why Not: No smart home technology here.

Would Suit: City-centric aristocrats.

NB: The exterior photo at top shows the back of the house. The front is just as attractive, but less dramatically set back.

UPDATE: This story has been edited to reflect that the house is in Guilford, on the Tuscany-Canterbury side.

2 COMMENTS

    • It is in Guilford, you are correct, but what the writer wanted to convey is that it is on the west side of Guilford, the Tuscany-Canterbury side, as opposed to the side east of Charles Street, near Sherwood Gardens.

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