Tag: teachers

Roland Park Educator Among Maryland Teacher of the Year Finalists

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Justin Holbrook. Photo via Baltimore City Public Schools.

Justin Holbrook is now representing Baltimore City Public Schools as a finalist for 2017-18 Maryland Teacher of the Year.

Greenlaurel: Teach For America Alums Sprout a Garden at Fredrick Douglass High

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Tij-anique Williams (left) said teacher Chris Jennings “is a great teacher. He looks out for us. When we’re stressed out, he has stepped in and cared.”

At Frederick Douglass High School in West Baltimore sits a tidy outdoor garden that offers a prime example of what Baltimore students can do with the right tools to harness the power of urban agriculture. Were it not for three dedicated Teach for America alums, it might be just another patch of asphalt.

City Schools Officials Hand Out 115 Pink Slips, Most of Them Outside of District Office

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Baltimore City Schools headquarters on North Avenue, via Wikimedia Commons

Baltimore City Public Schools is set to lay off 115 full-time employees this month, most of them in actual schools, rather than the central district office on North Avenue.

How to Change People’s Lives

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Tom Gleason
Tom Gleason

I heard over the holidays that my college advisor, a Russian History professor named Abbott Gleason, known as Tom, died on Christmas Day after a long struggle with Parkinson’s disease. The fact that I took even a single history course in college, much less ended up a history major, was completely this man’s doing.

Do Baltimore Teachers Have Too Much Work?

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overworked

It seems as though everyone’s mad about the new Common Core curriculum in public schools. First, an agitated parent made the national news after he got forcibly ejected from a school board meeting because he spoke out against the standards; now 8,700 Baltimore County teachers have filed a grievance against the school board, saying that the Common Core means they have way too much work.

Monitoring School Work: How Much Is Too Much?

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Got questions about life? Love? Parenting? Work? Today we introduce Whit’s End, a new advice column by local husband, father, teacher, coach, former executive and former Marine Corps officer Al Whitaker.  Each week Al will address readers’ questions about anything ranging from school issues, coaching problems, relationship quandaries and more!  His experience is vast, and he holds a degree in psychology, too. To submit a question, email WhitsEnd@baltimorefishbowl.com. – The Eds.

My son will be entering the 9th grade at an excellent independent school. He is a good student, but does not always assert himself.  For example, he will not tell his teacher if the homework took him two hours when he was told that it should take an hour.  If he is having a difficult time with an assignment, he won’t ask for help or tell the teacher that he needed extra time.

Since I know what he is like, how much should I help him?  If I monitor whether he is working or on-line, he tells me to stop treating him like a criminal.  If I know that he is weak in certain areas or doesn’t check his work carefully, shouldn’t I offer to look it over first? Isn’t my job to see that he gets the most out of his school experience and does as well as possible?

Also, how often should I communicate with his teachers? Would asking for a weekly report from his teachers be reasonable? I’d like to make sure sooner rather than later that he doesn’t get behind or unnecessarily struggle at a school that has a reputation for being rigorous academically.

I just feel if I don’t get involved, something will go wrong, and he will miss a valuable opportunity.

Concerned Mom in Baltimore

Dear Concerned Mom:

Knowing how much to help is a tricky balancing-act for both of you.  You don’t want him to slip, especially without a safety net. But the only way for him to gain confidence is to believe that he doesn’t need the net, even though you know that people are there to “spot” or catch him if he does fall. However, you should not be one of those catchers.

Zero Gravity Learning: Baltimore Teacher Goes to Space Camp

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Aklog in a aerotrim, a machine used for testing astronauts. Photo courtesy Honeywell.
Aklog in a aerotrim, a machine used for testing astronauts. Photo courtesy Honeywell.

Every year, a few dozen specially-chosen educators get to go to space. Okay, well, space camp. Baltimore Fishbowl caught up with Tamirate Ajkig, a science teacher at Digital Harbor High School who was one of the special few who got to spend a week at Honeywell Educators @ Space Academy at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

What was a typical day like?
The days were brutal! We’d wake up at 6am and might not get finished until 8pm. After a quick eat-and-run breakfast, we had classroom activities, simulations, team-building exercises, tours, and guest lecturers. We learned about everything from rocketry to robots to designing curricula.