Urban Landscape: Apartments Planned for Hutzler’s Palace Building; Cignal Launches Luxury Community in Lutherville, Professional Building Sells on Charles Street

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The Hutzler’s Palace Building

The top four floors of the former Hutzler Bros. Palace building at 210-218 N. Howard Street will most likely be converted to apartments, possibly Japanese-style “micro apartments,” and the first level will be converted to office space with an “open concept” coffee shop.

Those are the current plans of the building owner, AiNET, according to representative Jonathan Eaton. Eaton said in an email message that construction would ramp up after a temporary art exhibit on the first floor, “The Ground,” closes on May 19.

AiNET’s senior vice president for compliance and capital projects has already met with architects and expects to complete the project by the end of the year, Eaton said.

Cignal Corp. Launches Sales for a 230-Acre Residential Community called Castanea in Lutherville

Cignal Corp. has selected Prime Building Advantage to direct the sales and marketing efforts at Castanea, a 230-acre residential community in Lutherville.

The community at 11700 Falls Road will have land for 40 custom-built home sites, ranging in size from two to 20 acres. The land is the former Chestnut Ridge Country Club and also includes several lots on what was once the golf course. Castanea takes its name from the Latin word for chestnut.

The home sites are available for immediate purchase. Prime Building Advantage also manages sales and marketing for the Four Seasons Residences, the Ritz Carlton Residences and Liberty Harbor East in Baltimore City.

“We are thrilled to bring the luxury experience Baltimore has come to demand from properties like the Ritz Carlton and Four Seasons Residences to Baltimore County,” said Charlie Hatter, co-owner of Prime Building Advantage, in a statement. “Elegant new communities of this magnitude in a truly unparalleled location like Castanea are rare and sought after by those who desire an estate-caliber home.”

Professional Building at 330 N. Charles Street Sells for $3.7 Million

SVN Real Site announced that it has arranged the sale of the Professional Building at 330 N. Charles Street for $3.7 million to “a West Coast buyer” who is expanding into holdings in Baltimore.The 33,078-square-foot building was constructed in 1906 and renovated in 2006. It has 25 apartments and two street-level retail spaces.

The transaction was arranged by Justin Verner, senior advisor and leader of SVN’s Multifamily Practice, and Brooks Healy of SVN. SVN served as an exclusive advisor and agent for the seller, Edward Scott of Kline Scott Visco.

“The Professional Building is a historically stable Class B asset located in a desirable block of Downtown Baltimore,” Verner said in a statement. “The purchaser will look to increase below market rents, install new retail tenants, and take advantage of the area’s future upside.”

Gallery Grill on Centre Street is for Sale

The Gallery Grill, a coffee shop and lunch spot across from the Walters Art Museum entrance at 13 W. Centre Street, has been listed for sale. The business has not been open in recent days, and no one answers the phone number on the door. Blue & Obrecht Realty/CORFAC International has the listing.

Brooklyn Medical Center Sold

The Brooklyn Medical Center, a fully leased 6,912 square-foot office building at 3721 Potee Street in Brooklyn, has been purchased by Chatman-Harris Funeral Homes. Paul Obrecht III and Patrick Smith of Blue & Obrecht Realty/CORFAC International represented the seller.

Ed Kohls joins Rubeling & Associates

Architect Ed Kohls has joined Rubeling & Associates as a vice president, with a focus on expanding the firm’s higher-education practice.

Before joining Rubeling, Kohls was the managing principal of the academic design studio at Ayers Saint Gross. Rubeling is the architecture and interior design division of Johnson, Mirmiran & Thompson.

Ed Gunts

Ed Gunts

Ed Gunts writes Urban Landscape on Mondays in the Baltimore Fishbowl. He is the former architecture critic for The Baltimore Sun.
Ed Gunts