Art

Stan Lee is All About the Experience

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Seize the day, seize the book… just make sure you pay for it first. Stan Lee, the store cat at Carpe Librum needs the bucks for his kitty treats. He loves his treats, but more than that, Stan is all about the experience. Books and bookstores are a crucial part of the cat and human community.

Humans, those handy two-legged head scratchers, might be able to buy books online, but you can’t pay homage to felines or to Stan Lee by staying home in your PJs. Supporting Carpe Librum is supporting your local cat and human population.

Stan Lee has been with the store since it opened in January of 2020, but he’s an experienced bibliocat and has been selling online since 2016. Sometimes, you just need to expand your fan base and create your own reality by opening a storefront.

Stan’s thought on books, bookstores, and holding court with his adoring fans run deep. We talked with Mr. Stan Lee from his favorite pile of books at Carpe Librum.

Visit Carpe Librum Bookstore and Art Gallery for the Literature – But Stay for the Bookstore Cat, Stan Lee

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Some bookstores boast having a cat on the premises, but a new bookstore in Parkville has dedicated a Twitter account and part-ownership to its domestic, short-haired black beauty.

Carpe Librum Bookstore and Art Gallery, which opened Jan. 21 at 7221 Harford Road, counts 361 Twitter fans for its bookstore cat Stan Lee. And bookstore owner Melissa Eisenmeier even jests that her cat is her business partner.

“It’s something I started half joking about after seeing an article about a bookstore cat in New York City, who apparently said he was the co-owner, and Stan Lee acted like he was in charge. Some might have a bookstore cat, but the bookstore cat being part owner is something of a novelty.”

Rahne Alexander and Harry Carpenter spending some time with the co-owner, Stan Lee.

The bookstore specializes in both new and used books from small press publishers, including Philadelphia’s Lanternfish Press, Lethe Press of New Jersey, Oregon’s Ashland Creek Press and Baltimore’s own Mason Jar Press. The shop also stocks fun non-book items, including dog bandanas, bookmarks and notecards made by locals. The gallery also features local artists and emphasizes abstract art. Eventually she would like to stock more locally made arts and crafts.

Jennifer Berk Paintings at Monument Sotheby’s Office in Ruxton – Opening This Thursday

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As part of the ongoing commitment to the community, the Monument Sotheby’s International Realty office located in Roland Park has began hosting gallery shows for local artists. The Ruxton office is following their lead. Opening this Thursday, January 30, 2020 and running until March 18, we will be featuring the paintings of Jennifer Berk.

Jennifer is an expressionist painter and works primarily in acrylic and mixed medium on canvas and paper. After a 25-year career in marketing, Jennifer began studying abstract, landscape and figurative painting under a variety of accomplished, nationally known painters. Never having attended a school of art, Jennifer is otherwise self-taught. Her work has been exhibited in a variety of juried and non-juried shows and can be found in regional and local corporate offices, as well as in private collections from Florence, Italy to Santa Fe, New Mexico.

BMA Hosts Art After Hours On Friday, January 31

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The Baltimore Museum of Art’s popular evening event, Art After Hours, returns on Friday, January 31 from 8pm – 11pm. Spend an evening celebrating radical self-expression through art and fashion inspired by the new exhibition, Ellen Lesperance: Velvet Fist, and the BMA’s retro-cool lobby installation, Mickalene Thomas: A Moment’s Pleasure. Tickets are $25 general admission and $20 for BMA Members, include a free ticket for food or drink. Tickets can be purchased in person at the BMA Box Office, online, or at the door the evening of the event if tickets are still available.

Looking for more? On Sunday, February 2, join Ellen Lesperance for a free knitting workshop from 12pm – 3pm. Open to all ages and skill levels, participants can create squares or strips, culminating an un-patterned or anarchist sweater created by the group. Whether you attend one or both events, it will be a weekend for the arts!

BmoreArt News Briefs: Emily Breiter becomes Bromo Arts district director; Deutsch Foundation names Jessica Solomon as vice president; MICA awarded in National Democracy Challenge; and more

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The following art news briefs have been compiled by our friends at BMore Art. To read more at BmoreArt, click here.

Emily Breiter comes in as Bromo Arts District Executive Director

In a press release, Amy Cavanaugh Royce, board chair of the Bromo Arts District and executive director of Maryland Art Place, welcomed Emily Breiter as the arts district’s next executive director. Breiter formerly worked on business engagement, fundraising, and events at the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore. Breiter will replace Claudia Jolin in the position, but Jolin will remain on the Bromo Board of Directors.

Hidden Histories: The I. Henry Photo Project

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Webster Phillips was around 9 years old when he first went out on assignment for the Baltimore Sun. Irving Phillips, his father, a staff photographer, brought Webster along with an extra camera so he could act as second photographer, getting detail shots while Irving focused on the action.

He was learning the family trade. Webster’s grandfather, I. Henry Phillips, was a photographer at the Afro-American newspaper. His father, Irving, also worked for the Afro, and traveled around the South with Martin Luther King Jr., documenting his speeches for the paper. In 1969, after he returned from serving in Vietnam, Irving was the first Black photographer hired by the Sun. Even Webster’s grandmother, Laura Phillips, worked in the Afro’s archive.

Baltimore Museum of Art to Host FREE Event with 1619 Project Journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones, Activist/Art Collector Pamela Joyner, and Artist Zoe Charlton

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On Tuesday, December 17, The Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA) will host The Necessity of Tomorrow(s): Future Histories, a free conversation with award-winning journalist Nikole Hannah- Jones who created The 1619 Project for The New York Times; activist/art collector Pamela J. Joyner; and Baltimore-based artist and art professor Zoë Charlton. The event is part of the BMA’s The Necessity of Tomorrow(s) series, which brings together artists, writers, and thought leaders to examine and discuss issues and ideas at the intersections of art, race, and social justice. The Necessity of Tomorrow(s): Future Histories is free and open to the public from 6 to 10 p.m. Seating is first come, first seated in the BMA Auditorium and in live-streamed locations throughout the museum. The event includes free admission to the BMA’s Generations: A History of Black Abstract Art exhibition and cocktail reception with music, cash bar, and light bites. For more information, please click here.

The BMA Presents Major Exhibition Exploring Development of Abstract Art Through the Work of Black Artists

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The Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA) presents Generations: A History of Black Abstract Art, an exhibition that captures the significant contributions that black artists have made to the development of abstraction from the 1940s to the present. On view through January 19, 2020, Generations explores the multifaceted power of abstract art as experimental practice, personal exploration, and profound political choice for decades of black artists. The exhibition features nearly 80 paintings, sculptures, and mixed-media installations by such notable artists as Kevin Beasley, Mark Bradford, Sam Gilliam, Jennie C. Jones, Norman Lewis, Lorna Simpson, and Alma W. Thomas. The exhibition is curated by Christopher Bedford, BMA Dorothy Wagner Wallis Director, and Katy Siegel, BMA Senior Research & Programming Curator and Thaw Chair of Modern Art at Stony Brook University. The exhibition is co-organized by the BMA and the Ogden Museum of Southern Art.

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