Roland Park

Up On The Hill:Best Porch In Roland Park

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HOT HOUSE: 203 Ridgewood Road, Baltimore, 21210

 

Shingle-style Victorian, built in 1901 by a Scottish shipbuilder, on the market for the first time since 1965. Well-maintained, with eight bedrooms, five full baths on .35 acres: $949,000

 

What: A historians and architects delight, this is a much-admired Roland Park home, whose owners, Martin and Meredith Millspaugh, are longtime Baltimore civic leaders. The front porch is spectacular  –wrapping around the front of the house, overlooking the tree-lined street, with polished cabinet-grade fir floors and mahogany railings.  It’s hard to move inside from the porch, but once there, you are welcomed by rooms flooded in light, and a circular design that moves gracefully around through living room, family room, mud room, pantry, kitchen and dining room, all well-proportioned and generously endowed with fireplaces. The kitchen is large and airy, modern in feeling, with a custom designed, Spanish-style adobe fireplace in the eating area, a large range-hood, aged oak cabinets and Portuguese tiles.  Rooms upstairs flow nicely off a central landing. There is a very large master suite, with dressing rooms and bath.   Third floor has a long, sunny playroom/studio with lots of built-in storage and closets. Some modernization is needed: the bathrooms, naturally, where a few more showers would come in handy, and the kitchen want some updating — maybe just new appliances.  Hopefully no one will touch the kitchen fireplace, or the silk panels in the dining room.  From the back, there is level rear access from the lane behind the house. The basement is unfinished, but dry as a bone, roof and furnace have been recently replaced. There is some a/c, you may want to add some more.     

 

Where: Ridgewood Road is a right turn off of Roland Avenue heading south, just

before Cold Spring Lane.  The house is about halfway down the street, on the right. Cold Spring Lane takes you right out to 83 and Falls Road, and you are just a walk from Miss Shirley’s, Video American and Petit Louis.

 

Why: First, the porch is a dream.  Your 50th birthday, your daughter’s wedding reception … right here. You can practically hear the clinking wine glasses. Second, it’s unusually tight and comfortable for such a large house – must be the shipbuilder ….

 

Would Suit: Modern, (or not) Family.

 

NB: Backyard is not large, but plenty of room for the swing set and lacrosse pitch.

 

 

 

 

Rambling Roland Park Beauty

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HOT HOUSE: 204 Ridgewood Road, Baltimore 21210

A uniquely designed shingle-style mansion in Roland Park, built in 1900.  Over five thousand square ft. house on a one acre lot, with eight bedrooms, five baths, six working fireplaces and porches with views: $1,195,000

 

What: Holy gables, batman! A prime example of this great American architecture style. What’s special, besides the wide, domed gable in the front, is the amount of natural light that floods the interior from large, well-placed windows on the south-facing rear of the house. Porches wrap the house and overlook landscaped gardens, sloping lawn and trees. Enter the grand foyer, where sunshine from a huge, leaded glass window at the top of the double-wide stairs pours down to illuminate the ground floor. Sightlines are nicely designed, there are views of porches and sky from nearly every room. Large dining room to the right of the entrance hall, with the gourmet kitchen behind — it’s distinctive turquoise cabinetry might not be your first choice, but it works. Left side of the entrance has the living room, opening to a family room behind. All these rooms are big, (like 20’x15)’ so you may need to up the furniture budget.

Upstairs, many bedrooms, brochure says five, you could call it eight. The master bedroom has walk-in closets and en-suite bathroom, all on the old-fashioned side.  Bathrooms could use some updating too, showers are small. On the upside, there are several very functional claw-footed bathtubs.  The third floor has a wonderful artists studio, with windows on three sides, a few other bedrooms and a fantastic long narrow, light-filled room lined with built-in cabinets and drawers, like a butler’s pantry. There are also several enclosed porches with leaded glass windows. Hardwood floors throughout, unfinished basement, four-zoned radiator heating and a/c.

Where: Ridgewood Road leads off of Roland Avenue heading south, turn right just a few feet before Cold Spring Lane. Many of Roland Park’s prettiest houses are here, and there are sidewalks wide enough for dogs and strollers, making the ten minute stroll to Petit Louis or Eddie’s a pleasure. Literally two minutes to 83, via Cold Spring Lane, so a 10-minute drive to downtown Baltimore.  

Why:  The third floor artist studio, the porches, the back yard, the wide and generous spaces, the wonderful windows.

Would Suit: Executive family new to Baltimore, can’t believe what $1.2 million gets you here.  Landed Baltimore family, ready to ditch the starter home, not ready for the Valley.  Architecture buffs.

Why not: You can hear, but not see, Cold Spring Lane behind the wooded backyard. 

Fireworks! Parades! Fun! Today is the Fourth!

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Roland Park Parade, 2011. Photo by Susan Dunn.

UPDATED TO REFLECT ACTIVITY 7/4/2012 ONLY

Fourth of July firework displays and parades abound today.  Take the time to get outdoors and enjoy your friends and neighbors.  (Take your mind off  the power outages and storm damage too!)

The list of firework displays below comes from the Office of the State Fire Marshal and includes the organizations that have received permits to display fireworks tonight and tomorrow night. Some of the firework displays are private — the country clubs, for sure — but if you can find a spot nearby, you can enjoy the spectacle, too.

If we have left out your neighborhood parade, please let us know at [email protected] and we will add it to the parade list.

Our team at Baltimore Fishbowl will be enjoying a relaxed work schedule tomorrow so we can spend the day with family and friends, too.

Happy 4th!

Fireworks – July 4

Baltimore’s Inner Harbor
401 Light Street
Baltimore, MD 21202

Time: 9:30

Catonsville High School (rain date: July 7)
421 Bloomsbury Avenue, Catonsville 21228

Time: 9:15

Fullerton Park (rain date: July 5)
4304 Fullerton Avenue, Baltimore 21236

Time: 9:00

Grange Elementary School (rain date: July 6)
2000 Church Road, Dundalk 21222

Time: 9:15

Greenspring Valley Hunt Club (rain date: July 5)
30 Greenspring Valley Road, 21117

Time: 9:00

Loch Raven Tech Academy (rain date: July 5)
8101 LaSalle Road, Baltimore 21286

Time: 9:15

Oregon Ridge Park (rain date: July 5)
13401 Beaver Dam Road, Cockeysville 21030

Time: 9:45

 

Roland Park Condo Combines elegance and convenience

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HOT HOUSE: 6 Upland Road, Apt. F-3, Baltimore, 21210

Luxury three bedroom condominium, completely renovated in 2007, in a landmark Beaux-Arts building in Roland Park with private courtyard and gardens: $448,500 

What: Nestled deep in the heart of Roland Park, among the big Victorians and summer cottages of old Baltimore, lie the Upland Road condominiums. Silence reigns, except for the hum of dragonflies over the courtyard reflecting pool. Both grounds and property look very well maintained. Apartment F-3 is generously proportioned, at  2,169 sq. ft., with the high ceilings and thick plaster walls of an earlier era. The recent renovation has created an open, modern space, with a 30’ living/dining room and beautiful kitchen/family room with lots of built-in storage and gas fireplace. The master bedroom (15’x16’) has a large walk-in closet with built-ins for storage, as well as a marble bath. Custom lighting, crown molding, hardwood floors, two additional large bedrooms and a second full bath.  The kitchen has a breakfast bar, also plenty of space for a table, and new appliances. Everything is fresh, so you could move in here tomorrow. Elevator access. Parking included in list price.   

Where:  Upland Road leads off of Roland Avenue, number six is at the intersection of Upland and Club Road, diagonally across from the Baltimore Country Club clubhouse. The nearby and picturesque Tudor style shops (“first shopping mall in the country” a plaque reads) on Roland Avenue include not only neighborhood favorite, French bistro Petit Louis, but a planned new ‘neighborhood’ restaurant from the Tony Foreman/Cindy Wolf restaurant group. 

Why:  A great walking neighborhood. Apartments have an unusually gracious and solid feel. Peaceful and safe, just lock the door and leave. 

NB:  No central air. Place has a grown-up feeling, probably not  ideal for raising kids.

Would Suit: Empty nesters, singles, or young couples who’ve outgrown the downtown scene. Also part-time Baltimoreans (six months in Roland Park, six months in the south of France…)


Robert E. Lee Park: Moving To the County From the City

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For  residents and neighbors in the Ruxton/Riderwood area,  reopening of the Robert E. Lee Park, 454 acres of beautiful wooded land with Lake Roland as it’s heart, is a long-awaited event. The park has been officially closed since fall of 2009, to allow work on the main bridge that crosses the dam. But behind the scenes, a lot of people have been working hard to restore Robert E. Lee Park (one of the largest parks in Baltimore County) to its former glory and rightful place among the most beautiful open spaces in the area.

Interestingly, the most significant aspect of the park reopening will take place only on paper.  In 2009, Baltimore County took over management of the park from Baltimore City in a  no-cost  50 year lease,  automatically renewable for another 50 years.  Similar successful arrangements already exist, including a lease between Baltimore City and Anne Arundel County for Fort Smallwood Park, and between Baltimore City and Baltimore County for Cromwell Bridge Park. 

Beahta Davis is the area coordinator of nature and recreation resources for the Baltimore County Recreation and Parks Department.  She explained the county’s reasons for the takeover of the Robert E. Lee Park and the much needed improvements. “We saw it as a hidden gem that was underutilized” she said in an interview with the Baltimore Daily Record last fall. Our “mission is to revitalize what exists and to add to it in terms of recreational activities”.

A bit of history

While the Robert E. Lee Park is located entirely within Baltimore County, it was until recently owned and operated by the City of Baltimore.  Originally constructed in 1861 by damming  the Jones Falls, the park served as a water source  not only for city residents, but for Baltimore, Harford and Anne Arundel county residents for 53 years, until it was determined that the water quantity was insufficient. Since 1914, the park has been used as a recreational facility managed by Baltimore City. By the 1990’s City budgets were simply too stretched to pay for proper oversight and maintenance, and in recent years, the property was allowed to deteriorate to the point where people were found actually living in the park. In addition, soil samples revealed dangerously toxic levels  of e-coli bacteria due to dog feces. 

New funding

As a result of the takeover by Baltimore County,  $6.1 million in state and county funding was obtained for improvements  determined to be necessary for the safety and preservation of the park. These improvements include rebuilding of the bridge, improving parking and Light Rail access to the park, restoration of walking and biking trails, and shoring up the banks of the reservoir, which had severely eroded. In addition, a one-acre, enclosed, off-leash dog walking facility is planned. Security will be provided by Baltimore County police.  While the $6.1 million will cover the cost of all of the initial improvements, is hoped that  voluntary contributions by residents and neighbors, as well as monthly event programming, will help to offset costs of park maintenance and stewardship.

In October of 2010, members of the already existing Riderwood/Ruxton/ Lake Roland Area Improvement Association and other volunteers formed the Robert E. Lee Park Nature Center (RELPNC), and began monthly meetings  under the leadership of Peter Maloney, President. A Community Plan for the park was officially adopted by the Baltimore County Council,  reinforcing the commitment on both sides to working closely together to run the park. Volunteers at the Nature Council will work closely with the Baltimore County Recreation and Parks on improving and maintaining key areas of the park, and will begin a membership drive in Fall 2011 through Spring 2012.

Jeff  Budnitz, Treasurer of the Nature Council, and an early supporter of the Robert E. Lee Park revitalization efforts, credits the hard work of many individuals for the success of the park take over, including Baltimore County councilman (now County Executive) Kevin Kamentetz, for his  “tremendous advocacy of the park, including the establishment of new RC7 zoning” to prevent the selling of park land for development. “The county put together the budget” says Budnitz, “and everything that was committed to is being done. A long term Master Plan is being developed, to be accomplished in multiple phases. We are completing phase I now, and there will have to be public input going forward”.  

What’s on the table? Very likely, a multiple-use facility with easy access from the Baltimore Light Rail, that will include boating, biking, trail-walking, educational programming, a child’s play area and dog walking. Robert E. Lee is a “passive” park, which typically means no lighted athletic fields, no swimming pool, and no tennis courts, among other things. While the definition of “passive park” often includes no dog walking, there are plans to include an enclosed off-leash dog walking area at Robert E. Lee, possibly open only to members, for a nominal annual fee. Eventually, playing fields may be added. Overall, the park improvements promise a big leap forward in quality of life in the Baltimore area.

Local reactions? Surprisingly positive 

We questioned local residents and park neighbors about the changes, and got a uniformly enthusiastic response – even on the  potentially touchy issue of voluntary private funding to supplement the  initial Baltimore County investment. 

 “If you care about your community, you need to be willing to get behind it” says Chris Feiss. “I can see bald eagles flying over the lake from my backyard, and that’s got to be worth something to me”. Cheryl Finney, another park neighbor, agrees.  Although the park has generally been a good neighbor, Finney cites occasional problems in past years of trash and off-leashed dogs making the northwestern peninsula occasionally unpleasant. “I am a believer in private involvement and ownership of issues relating to community” Finney states. Asked how much she would be willing to contribute, she says “I’m not sure, but I’m willing to listen.  I’d love to see the public use the park more, and it definitely deserves stewardship”.

The specific financial goals of the Nature Council are still being determined. Jeff Budnitz points out,  “You have to have a pretty solid plan before you ask for the money. We are almost there”. According to Beahta Davis, “the Nature Council is in the driver’s seat with this,” referring to both the fundraising and planning for park programming and maintenance . The hope, everyone agrees, is to eventually be largely self-sufficient.

The  official reopening of Robert E. Lee Park is tentatively scheduled for September, 2011. Stay tuned for further updates and opening day activities.

 

Country Feel in City Limits

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Hot House: 1022 Saint Georges Road, Baltimore, 21210

Storybook stone lodge/compound on 3.5 acres in North Roland Park: $2,195,000

What: Built in 1900, a Tudor style estate home, a hunting lodge in the city. Owned by recently deceased prominent attorney H. Morton “Mort” Rosen, who clearly loved to entertain. Formal living and dining rooms on the first floor are impressive — masculine but still warm-feeling, with a wood-paneled library, sun room and eat-in kitchen. Downstairs, a second catering kitchen and giant oak-paneled, timber-ceilinged great room, with huge fireplace and French doors out to the garden.  Awesome gathering space for big groups of family/friends. Five bedrooms, four full baths. Could use a little updating, mainly cosmetic, as the place has been scrupulously cared for. The grounds are landscaped and lovely, private and partly wooded.   Surprising that there’s no pool, although plenty of space for one.   

Where: at the end of a long private lane on St. Georges Road–one of  north Baltimore’s most beautiful streets.  Nice for walking, and good access to Roland Park amenities, private schools, post office, grocery and Starbucks. 

Why: One of a kind, extremely private home in the city. Masterful stonework outside and no-expense-spared details inside all done with great taste. 

Why not: House is a little dark, although views of the sunny, landscaped grounds are nice. 

Would suit: City lovers who need their own space. Don Corleone.

Prisitine Roland Park Victorian

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Hot House: 117 Beechdale Road, Baltimore, 21210

Classic Victorian, all systems go, in the heart of Roland Park:

$995,000

What: A beautifully renovated Victorian, circa 1905 — that rare Roland Park house with everything in perfect working order –no peeling paint, no clanking radiators, and insulation!  A recent and total makeover, which included central air as well as all new windows and doors, has transformed this house into a high quality home with major curb appeal. From the welcoming porch, a gracious foyer leads to a generously proportioned living and dining rooms, both with wood burning fireplaces (think winter dinner parties in front of a glowing fire). Sunny windows draw you straight through to the back of the house, where a brand new custom cook’s kitchen promises a lifetime of great eating and big windows look up towards the big back yard, complete with big old trees and tasteful play area. Sleek but practical mudroom is a bonus. Upstairs, luxurious master bed and bath, walk-in closets and additional pretty bedrooms offer period touches like built in cupboards and polished wood floors. A nicely finished basement is now and would be, perfect for kids.  Side driveway with parking pad a plus, as is easy access to Rt. 83.  

Where: Between Falls Road and Roland Avenue, near the old Baltimore Country Club golf course. Walk to Eddie’s, walk to schools, walk to Petit Louis. Roland Park is in northwest Baltimore, a historic neighborhood designed by the Olmstead architectural firm (NY Central Park) – a ten minute drive to downtown. 

Why: A wide wraparound porch, great landscaping with a show-stopping planting of hostas in front, and modern, south-facing kitchen overlooking the terraced back yard – and all above-mentioned mod cons.

Why not: House sits up off the street, so requires some stair taking unless you’re first to the parking pad.

Would suit: Old house family who (heart) City Life, but not the hassles of city living.

 

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