From Mumbai to the Pacific Northwest and everywhere in between, digital nomads make their lives work for them. Some even bring cats and kids along. (Custom illustration for Technical.ly by Penji)

We’ve all probably thought about it while working from home: What if I tried something different?

The pandemic-borne remote work revolution made the option to drop everything and explore life in another corner of the world more possible than ever. Many didn’t need to leave their jobs. It even breathed new life into an old concept: digital nomadism.

I’ve dabbled in the practice myself, taking months-long excursions to stay with family in the mountains of Pennsylvania. But some one-time DC and Baltimore residents have quite literally taken their opportunity and ran, spending months and years far from the mid-Atlantic region.

It’s not just available to those who can work whatever hours they choose, either. The managers, COO and CEO who all shared their stories with Technical.ly had roughly the same takeaway: you not only can do this (while acknowledging costs that certain privileges allow) but should.

We’ll get to that, though. Below, learn about four people who made the world their oyster — and how they pulled it off.

A starting spark

By the end of 2019, Abhi Mathew, a project manager at Rockville, Maryland IT company Dataprise, had most of a decade on an H-1B work visa. Feeling frustrated with the past political regime’s attitude toward immigrants, he and his wife moved away with two kids in tow, “re-immigrating” to Bombay (now Mumbai), India.

Mathew had been working remotely for six years prior. He was confident that, after clearing it with his employer, he could work from anywhere. The plan, he told Technical.ly, was to expose their children to life in India for longer than their prior two-week vacations allowed.

Mathew had been working remotely for six years prior. He was confident that, after clearing it with his employer, he could work from anywhere. The plan, he told Technical.ly, was to expose their children to life in India for longer than their prior two-week vacations allowed.

The pandemic arrived four months later. Luckily, Mathew and his wife built a habit of working 9-to-5 EST hours, which was about 6:30 p.m. to 2:30 a.m. IST, so they could conduct business as usual.

“All this allowed us to reconnect with extended family and friends over a longer period of time,” Mathew said. “This was something that was not possible prior, with working from the US. Even during the pandemic, we felt completely safe and it was a great experience for my kids, who went to school remotely there for a year.”

Read more at Technical.ly