Maryland Is a Pretty Good State for Getting Injured on the Job

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ProPublica workers' compensation graphic
Via ProPublica

For most catastrophic injuries incurred while working, Maryland pays higher than average.

It’s not something most of us think about until it happens to us or a loved one, but when you suffer an injury from a workplace accident the money you receive from workers’ compensation can vary greatly (like, greatly) depending on what state you happen to live in, thanks to no federally mandated minimum payouts.

ProPublica put together an interactive infographic that compares payouts by state for the same injuries. Yes, there is something a little creepy about determining average cash values for every limb lost, but it’s very informative. (And very infuriating, considering the thought and care that should have gone into these seemingly arbitrary numbers.)

Here are Maryland’s maximum workers’ comp payouts by body part and how they stack up against the national average. (Federal workers have their own schedule of benefits, and they are much, much better.)

+ Arm: $301,600 ($131,722 HIGHER than the national average)
+ Leg: $301,600 ($148,379 HIGHER than the national average)
+ Hand: $251,802 ($106,872 HIGHER than the national average)
+ Thumb: $33,500 ($8,932 LOWER than the national average)
+ Index Finger: $6,720 ($17,754 LOWER than the national average)
+ Middle Finger: $5,880 ($15,116 LOWER than the national average)
+ Ring Finger: $5,040 ($9,620 LOWER than the national average)
+ Pinky: $4,200 ($7,143 LOWER than the national average)
+ Foot: $251,802 ($160,023 HIGHER than the national average)
+ Big Toe: $6,720 ($16,716 LOWER than the national average)
+ Eye: $251,802 ($155,102 HIGHER than the national average)
+ Ear: $41,875 ($3,825 HIGHER than the national average)

In Maryland, our hands and feet are highly valued, whereas our fingers and toes are not. It doesn’t add up to something terribly rational, but I’d rather get hurt here than in Alabama, where losing a leg gets you a measly $44,000 maximum.

Here’s ProPublica’s infographic, and here’s the accompanying article outlining the insanity of our current system.



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