Hottest August Ever in Maryland

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2016 was the country’s 5th hottest summer. August was Maryland’s hottest ever. Source: N.O.A.A.

If August felt hotter than usual, it was. Maryland experienced the warmest August since record keeping began in 1885.  Is it a one-time blip? Nope. Maryland’s temperatures have been consistently climbing. Curious what to do? Check out our three Greenhouse Gas slashing ideas below. Save money and support our planet.

August 2016 was the hottest ever since 1885. Source: N.O.A.A.
August 2016 was the hottest ever since 1885. Source: N.O.A.A.
Maryland's mean temperature has steadily climbed since 1975. Source: N.O.A.A.
Maryland’s mean temperature has steadily climbed since 1975. Source: N.O.A.A.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is the U.S. federal agency within the Department of Commerce that takes our planet’s temperature. Close to 7,000 scientists measure, track and report all kinds of weather, atmospheric and oceanic statistics.

As vehicle and coal-fired electricity use soared in the 1970s, so has the amount of Greenhouse Gases in our closed atmosphere (see below). Those extra gases are making our planet’s atmosphere, or its parka, thicker. A thicker atmospheric parka traps more of the sun’s heat. Now we’re feeling it.

Here’s what to do to cut your family’s greenhouse footprint:

  1. Read our step-by-step guide on how to switch your home’s electricity supplier from dirty power to 100 percent renewable. It’s cheaper than BGE’s standard dirty power. That’s about 22 percent CO2 savings.
  2. Your home is an energy hog. Read here about Maryland’s amazing programs, many are free, to cut your home’s energy use. Save big money, too. Another 25 percent greenhouse gas drop.
  3. Buy an electric vehicle or hybrid. Avoid an energy guzzler vehicle.
With rising heat-trapping chemicals (carbon dioxide CO2 and methane CH4) in our closed atmosphere comes rising global temperatures. Source: N.O.A.A.
With rising heat-trapping chemicals (carbon dioxide CO2 and methane CH4) in our closed atmosphere comes rising global temperatures. Source: N.O.A.A.

Laurel Peltier
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Laurel Peltier

Laurel writes the environmental GreenLaurel column every other Thursday in the Baltimore Fishbowl. A graduate of UVA's MBA program, she spends her time with her family and making "all things green" interesting.
Laurel Peltier
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