Lifeline

Five Good Reasons why You may Need to Spend HOURS in Urgent Care

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The last time I asked for a show of hands of who wanted to spend one single second more than is absolutely necessary in emergency or urgent care, despite my dramatic attempt at trying to up-sell the charm of the place and the INTERESTING PEOPLE (ahem) WHO WORK THERE, the results were as you would expect. Zero hands raised. We all have busy lives with carefully measured out schedules, and so when the need for unexpected urgent medical care presents itself we hope for the best to solve the problem as fast as possible. Healthcare marketing jumps right on the bandwagon, advertising minimal wait times and quick in and out care. Sometimes this works just great and is exactly what is needed, but sometimes it isn’t, and I want to present to you a few situations in which hanging around for a bit in emergency or urgent care really is to your benefit. Let’s see if I can convince you.

Zack Garber: Busy Helping Baltimore

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To pin down Zack Garber’s involvement in the Baltimore Jewish community, and the greater Baltimore community, would be difficult. From his professional career as a financial advisor on the Garber Wealth Management team, to his time spent on various boards, task forces and volunteer organizations (not to mention a personal project or two), Zack’s day is filled with one goal – how to help others. Zack sat down with us earlier this month to give us a glimpse into his day-to-day, what inspires him and what advice he has for those looking to change the narrative.

Did you grow up in the area?

I did. I grew up in the Owings Mills area, went to Beth Tfiloh for elementary school and then went to McDonogh for middle and high school. After that I took a training program in London for four months before moving to New York and then ultimately earned my MBA at Penn.

Calling all Baltimore Storytellers

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The Saul Zaentz Innovation Fund at Johns Hopkins has recently announced the opening of the latest round of applications to its groundbreaking program to help build a thriving film and media community in Baltimore.

The Fund is open to all Baltimore area residents and applicants are encouraged to apply by December 15 to one of three categories: narrative; documentary; or, VR/AR immersive media.

“We’re looking to help level the playing field for Baltimore creatives of all backgrounds, at all levels and stages of their careers,” says Annette Porter, director of the fund. “As we head into our fifth round, we are excited to open up new avenues for people to share stories that have been unheard or excluded.”

This year’s new Fellows will be announced on January 17. Throughout the Winter, Fellows will receive support of their projects through a series of workshops and mentorships with industry experts and then be eligible to apply for Production Funding in 2019. Over the last three years, the Fund has supported 70 Fellows and awarded over $900,000 to 41 projects.

Meet Brad and Melissa Hecht

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On November 20, The Associated will present its signature Keynote event, “After Pittsburgh: Pride, People & Power.” Held at Woodholme Country Club, the evening will feature a conversation with Bari Weiss, New York Times staff writer and editor and author of How to Fight Anti-Semitism.

Baltimore natives Bradley and Melissa Hecht are co-chairing the event with Morry and Lisa Zolet. We spoke to the Hechts about Keynote, Weiss and their involvement in the community.

Meet Mike Fuld

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Mike Fuld will never forget the first time he saw his wife, Samantha. He was working at Kutz Camp as a staff member; so was Samantha.

Mike and Samantha first met in 2006. They happened to both be assigned to work on an all-camp evening program. The rest, as Mike puts it, was history! They were married eight years later in 2014.

Overnight camp. For Mike, it was not only where he met his future wife, but the place where he spent more than 20 summers as a camper and a staff member. It was where he formed lifelong friendships, enjoyed summers filled with swimming, climbing the tower and rocking out during song sessions. It’s where he celebrated his Jewish identity through immersive, yet creative, programs that emphasized Jewish values and traditions.

“What also really stands out about camp is that you gain independence and the experience of living as a community,” says Mike whose parents also attended Jewish camp.

Get to Know Jeffrey Kahn, PhD, MPH

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A Q&A with Jeffrey Kahn, PhD, MPH, the Andreas C. Dracopoulos Director of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics and Levi Professor of Bioethics and Public Policy. Dr. Kahn is also the featured presenter for The Associated’s upcoming November 5 Maimonides Society program “Genetic Tinkering: Could We? Should We?”

What brought you to Baltimore? It was really a return to Baltimore for us, in that I did an MPH at Johns Hopkins in the mid 1980’s while I was a doctoral student at Georgetown and I always hoped I might have the chance to come back to the faculty. I was recruited back in 2011 and became director of the Berman Institute in 2016.

Meet Bill Robinson

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Bill Robinson admits that he may not be in Baltimore today, as the first executive director of The Associated’s new Center for Leadership, if it were not for a conversation he had with his sociology professor his sophomore year at college.

At the time, he was pursuing a degree in computer science. Yet, he was fascinated by society’s challenges.

“I started college thinking I would be addressing difficult problems that would ultimately yield solutions,” he recalls. “But my professor made me realize that the challenges we face in the social world are not easy to solve. In fact, sometimes we don’t know where to begin, as we can’t quite figure out what the problem is. To tackle that was thrilling – and set me on a path I never expected to be on.”

The Associated Expands its Green Initiatives

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In the wake of climate change, The Associated is doing its part to go “green.” From solar farms to green loans to reforestation, the organization is making a commitment to a more sustainable future.

“Climate change is real and is already affecting millions of people around the globe,” says Jakir Manela, Pearlstone’s chief executive officer.  “Just as many Jewish leaders stood up during the Civil Rights movement to push forward that critical progress for our country, so must we do so now.”

Pearlstone, an Associated agency, is at the forefront of these efforts.

Laurie Weitz Makes Women and Girls Her Priority

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Born and raised in Pennsylvania, Laurie Weitz arrived in Baltimore in 1993 for her husband’s business. Living in the Greenspring Valley area at the time, she quickly connected with the Jewish community. She was involved as the first co-chair, along with Ned Himmelrich, for ACHARAI, president of Hadassah for two terms, then participated in programs through Associated Women.

Today, this businesswoman – her family owns restaurants at BWI – is chairing the Jewish Women’s Giving Foundation (JWGF) at The Associated. JWGF is a giving circle that empowers women, each of whom contributes the same amount, to direct grants to organizations that support women and girls.

Jewish Private Schools are Bringing Community Home

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When Anna Klein’s daughter, Mia, was a four-year-old preschooler at Beth Tfiloh Dahan Community School (BT), her class was asked to bring in brown bag lunches for the homeless. The bags were being delivered to Beans and Bread, a soup kitchen in Fells Point, not far from where the family was living at the time.

“I volunteered to drop them off,” recalls Klein. “And when I did, it was because these are the values I want my children to learn. I want them to know that they have an obligation to give back, not only to the Jewish community, but also to the global community. And, Beth Tfiloh emphasized the values of going out in the world and doing good.”

It was this commitment to civic responsibility, coupled with the knowledge that a Jewish private school education* developed the Jewish identity of its students, that was instrumental in her desire to see her children attend BT.

“I attended Jewish private schools through 12th grade and am the grandchild of a Holocaust survivor so my Jewish identity was always very strong and a big part of who I am,” she adds.

“A Jewish day school education has proven to be one of the most important entities in securing the next generation of Jews – no matter how they choose to identify as Jews,” says Michael Elman, who co-chairs The Associated’s Day School Commission with David Hurwitz.

“The value added,” he adds “is that Jewish day schools also allow Jewish students to grow their Jewish identity without sacrificing academics but actually enhancing them.”

Recognizing the impact Jewish private schools have on the next generation of Jews, The Associated: Jewish Federation of Baltimore provides scholarship assistance to students at 11 Baltimore day schools to ensure students interested in attending can receive a Jewish education.

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