Maryland confirms state’s first case of community transmission of COVID-19

0
Share the News


This illustration, created at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), depicts the exterior structure of the coronavirus disease 2019, or COVID-19. Image courtesy of CDC.

Maryland health officials have confirmed the first case of community transmission of COVID-19 in the state, Gov. Larry Hogan announced Thursday.

Hogan first announced Wednesday night that a Prince George’s County resident was one of three new cases of coronavirus.

Health officials determined that the patient had no known exposure to the coronavirus through travel or an infected individual, and they identified the individual as the first case of community transmission of COVID-19 in Maryland, said a statement from Hogan’s office on Thursday.

“The first case of COV-19 community transmission in Maryland means we are entering a new phase of working to mitigate and limit the spread of this pandemic,” Hogan said in a statement. “What we are seeing now is what we have been anticipating and preparing for over the last several weeks.”

Hogan said he will be announcing major actions the state is taking to protect public health and safety during a press conference at 4 p.m. Thursday at the State House.

As of 1:09 p.m. Thursday, there are 12 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Maryland, including including six in Montgomery County, four in Prince George’s County, one in Harford County, and one in Baltimore County.

Hogan also announced Wednesday that a Montana resident visiting Anne Arundel County had tested positive for COVID-19.

That individual was classified as a Montana case and therefore does not count toward Maryland’s count, but Maryland and Anne Arundel County health departments are taking the lead on the investigation, a statement from Hogan’s office said.

Hogan, Maryland House Speaker Adrienne Jones and Maryland Senate President Bill Ferguson signed emergency legislation into law permitting the state to transfer up to $50 million from its rainy day fund to put toward an emergency response to the coronavirus Monday.

Marcus Dieterle


Share the News