Tag: jhu

Best Door In Baltimore: Shades Of New Orleans In A Charles Village Revival

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Hot House: 19 W. 27th Street, Baltimore, MD 21218
27th street:door

Federal style row house in painted brick, circa 1900, attached, end-of-group,with rear porch and multiple balconies. Completely renovated, with recent replacement roof. Four bedrooms, 2 full baths, 1,600 sq. ft. over three stories. New kitchen with granite counters, Jenn Air and GE appliances, extensive storage. Large bedrooms and closets, many original architectural features. Unfinished basement. Rear parking pad, zoned heat and central air: $343,000 (ask about CHAP tax credit)

House of the Day: Contemporary Townhouse In Great Station North Location, Garage Parking

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$257,000 123 Lafayette Avenue East, Greenmount West 3 bedroom(s), 3 bathroom(s) 123 Lafayette Avenue East 123 Lafayette Avenue East 123 Lafayette Avenue East

Baltimore Poet Dyane Fancey Dies, Leaves Us with Perfect Poem

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Dyane Fancey Dies at 63
Poet Dyane Fancey

I didn’t know poet Dyane Fancey personally, but I can’t help but feel a kinship with her. Her CV included a stint as a painting student at Maryland Institute College of Art before an eventual master’s degree from the Johns Hopkins University Writing Seminars. The master’s is from 1981, but her peculiar, multidisciplinary educational route would make just as much sense in Baltimore’s current cross-pollination-loving arts scene.

For a more complete life story, see the Baltimore Sun obituary. What I would like to talk about is a poem of Fancey’s that placed in City Paper‘s 2009 poetry contest. It’s called “Multitasking.” It begins like this:

Multitasking
Is how bizarre things end up in the freezer:
Car keys, wallet, medications that can be stored on the shelf.

Then comes a friendly admonition to “Be here, / Here, now” — advice we might just as easily give ourselves, if we wanted to hear it. The poems ends like this:

Garrison Forest School- Educating Thinkers for the Future

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GFS

Lauren Gillis, GFS WISE student, at work in an engineering lab at Johns Hopkins University.

It’s 2013, and everyone still wants to know why there are so few women in science. With women making huge strides in workplace equality in other fields, science and engineering still remain largely boys’ clubs. Earlier this month, the New York Times reported on a study done at Yale showing that science professors, when presented with job applications from two young scientists with the same qualifications (one male, the other female), they were significantly more likely to offer the man a job. And if they did hire the woman, her salary would, on average, start about $4,000 lower than the man’s. Oof. Disappointing. But surprising? Maybe not.

We know that girls are rarely encouraged to pursue math and science—and those that do may lose their natural inclination toward the field when they face the reality of how tough it can be for women in the professional realm. But now imagine a place where young women are actively encouraged to pursue their interest in these fields. And it’s not just in the classroom. Here, upper school students get in-depth, immersive (read: really exciting) mentorships that take them into actual research laboratories. At John Hopkins. Of course, this place does exist, and it’s at Garrison Forest School– which is continuing to grow their fabulous WISE (Women in Science and Engineering) program.

The WISE program at Garrison Forest has been in existence for nine years now. And by the end of this year, almost a third of Garrison Forest students now participate by the time they graduate. In fact, the mentorship program is so popular  that the school has introduced a new WISE program in Classics, with two students working on an epigraphy project last spring,  at the JHU Archaeological Museum. They spent a semester studying a Roman funerary, and culminated their research by presenting their findings at two public gatherings at the museum — including an academic symposium at which they were the only high school presenters.

Looking Chic, Big Easy Bound

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As Sartorial Baltimoreal photographer Lee Kriel and I rounded the corner at the JHU Barnes and Noble on St. Paul recently, she said to me, “Look at the purple coat with the old Samsonite luggage straight ahead.”  I saw nothing more than a bunch of kids waiting for the bus, but as we walked closer, Charles Village couple Anna and Ross came clearer. When they turned around and Anna’s magnificent eyes met me, the flashes went off! Sometimes only the trained eye of a photographer can spot the stars in a well-populated scene.

Ross Brendle, 28, and Anna Hoffman, 25

 

 

 

Hi!  Where are you all traveling?
Anna: We are going to New Orleans to see my family.

Are you boyfriend and girlfriend?
We are married. 

What do you do here in Baltimore? 
Anna: I work at the front desk of the BMA.
Ross: I am a graduate student in classical archaeology at Hopkins. I want to be a professor.

You both look so fashionable.  Did you think about what you were wearing on the plane this morning?
Anna: I always think about what I wear. I love fashion. I am an artist and I knit all the time. (She made the scarf she is wearing.) 
Ross: I dressed as I normally would dress.

And your individual styles?
Anna: I think I am colorful-vintage, highlighting homemade knits!
Ross: Stylish academic.

You are both so retro! Your cats-eye glasses and lined eyes, Anna (such the rage now). Your coat. Your shoes. Ross, I love your hair and cardigan! So ’50s!  
Anna: I have been wearing eyeliner like this since I can remember. It’s so popular now.
Ross: My sweater is from H&M and my hair just has gel in it.

And this old Samsonite you are carrying? 
Anna: It’s from the 1960’s. And it cost $5! 

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