Which Local Universities’ Grads Make the Most Money?

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It’s not who you might expect. PayScale, a website that aggregates economic data to help people understand whether they’re under- (or over-) paid just released its 2012-13 data ranking various universities for their salary potential. A quick data point:  Princeton grads have an average starting salary of $58,300 and an average mid-career salary of $137,000. And because money isn’t everything, PayScale also asks alumni whether their job “makes the world a better place”; 49 percent of Princeton grads think that it does. (The site surveyed students with a bachelor’s degree from the institution, not MD/MA/PhD grads, in case you’re wondering). The lowest-earning school on the list is the online division of the Art Institute of Pittsburgh (because who goes to art school online!?), where fresh grads average $34,200 and those with a decade or more under their belt make $42,300, on average. Curious about how some local schools measure up? We’ve got the answers below:

26th place- Loyola University Maryland – starting salary $48,300; mid-career $104,000; high job meaning 39%

100th place – Johns Hopkins – starting salary $52,500; mid-career $90,200; high job meaning 65%

134th place – University of Maryland – starting salary $49,100; mid-career $87,100; high job meaning 54%

148th place – UMBC – starting salary $50,300; mid-career $86,300; high job meaning 53%

279th place – Towson University – starting salary $41,000; mid-career $79,800; high job meaning 50%

438th place – Notre Dame (Maryland) – starting salary $44,500; mid-career $72,900; high job meaning 63%

594th place – University of Baltimore – starting salary $46,100; mid-career $68,400; high job meaning 61%

612th place – Goucher College – starting salary $35,000; mid-career $67,900; high job meaning 56%

687th place – MICA – starting salary $38,200; mid-career $65,600; high job meaning 44%

879th place – Morgan State – starting salary $41,500; mid-career $59,000; high job meaning 64%

Interesting, isn’t it, that the school with the highest earning potential also has the lowest sense of job meaning, and that the lowest-earning school has the second-highest job meaning? Then again, Johns Hopkins students seem to have it pretty good — they can make a lot of money and still feel like they’re saving the world. How does your alma mater measure up?



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