Baltimore Rises to 25th-Most Expensive City to Rent an Apartment

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Charm City is now among the 25 priciest places in the United States to rent a one-bedroom apartment, according to one new study.

Zumper, an apartment rental listing website, compiles monthly rent data for one- and two-bedroom apartments from more than a million listings around the country. According to the most recent calculations for March, the median monthly rent for a one-bedroom apartment in Baltimore increased 4.5 percent, jumping from $1,100 to $1,150. The increase for a two-bedroom was a bit more modest at 2.3 percent, rising from $1,290 to $1,320.

What’s more significant here in relative terms is that Baltimore jumped three spots, from 28th-most expensive place to rent (a one-bedroom apartment) to 25th. That puts it right behind Denver ($1,210) and Nashville ($1,220), and ahead of the likes of Sacramento, Austin and Pittsburgh.

The 4.5-percent increase was also among the largest monthly increases among cities in the top 25 for March, behind Nashville (5.2 percent), Scottsdale, Ariz. (5 percent), Honolulu and Fort Lauderdale (both 4.7 percent).

Of course, these things oftentimes fluctuate from month to month, but the rent in Baltimore is too damn high appears to be consistently on the rise so far in 2017. In January, the median rent for a one-bedroom rose about one percent, and the month before, it jumped 4.8 percent.

In case you wondering, it’s still much more expensive to live only a bit further down I-95. Washington D.C. rental rates rose to a median of $2,040 for a one-bedroom in March, good enough for 7th-highest in the country.

Ethan McLeod
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Ethan McLeod

Senior Editor at Baltimore Fishbowl
Ethan has been editing and reporting for Baltimore Fishbowl since fall of 2016. His previous stops include Fox 45, CQ Researcher and Connection Newspapers in Northern Virginia. His freelance writing has been featured in Baltimore City Paper, Leafly, DCist and BmoreArt, among other outlets. He enjoys basketball, humid Mid-Atlantic summers and story tips.
Ethan McLeod
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