Ed Gunts

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Ed Gunts is a local freelance writer and the former architecture critic for The Baltimore Sun.

Eddie’s grocery store moving to the Belvedere to make way for 10-story apartment building

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Photo by Ed Gunts.

Eddie’s of Mount Vernon, the grocery store threatened with displacement by a 10-story apartment building, has found a new home one block away.

Developer Dennis Richter and Eddie’s owner Dennis Zorn announced yesterday that the grocery store will move next year from 7 W. Eager St., its home since 1988, to the lower level of the Belvedere condominiums at N. Charles and E. Chase streets.

New train station opens at Camden Yards

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Photo by Ed Gunts

Baltimore, the birthplace of American railroading, has a new train station.

Proposed Charm City Night Market mural gets thumbs down from preservation commission

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Photo by Ed Gunts

Leaders of Baltimore’s Chinatown Collective had what they thought was a promising idea for their second annual Charm City Night Market, coming up on Sept. 21.

They identified a prominent building where they envisioned painting a large mural, hoping to help draw people to the West Side district where the event will take place. The building owner agreed to it. Best of all, an artist collective from Washington D.C. offered to paint it for free.

But it’s not happening–not this year, at least.

Tractor Building conversion plan gets mixed reviews from city design panel

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The back of the proposed development in Clipper Mill. Rendering by Marren Architects.

A plan to construct apartments inside Woodberry’s historic Tractor Building drew both praise and criticism Thursday from Baltimore’s design review panel, which suggested the developer explore a different approach. 

Hopkins unveils preliminary plans for Agora Institute

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A rendering of the proposed design for Johns Hopkins University’s Agora Institute.

Johns Hopkins students will be able to have coffee in “The Factory” and listen to open-air concerts beneath the “Conversation Cube” when they visit the next major building on the Homewood campus.

Those are nicknames for parts of the planned Stavros Niarchos Foundation Agora Institute, an interdisciplinary center targeted for completion in 2022.

Woodberry residents question whether a proposed development is ‘historic’ enough

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Rendering by Marren Architects

Another preservation controversy is brewing in historic Woodberry, just as residents are deciding whether to have their area designated a city historic district.

The Baltimore Eagle goes dark again, owner plans to bring in new management

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Photo by Ed Gunts

Saturday night is usually a busy time at the Baltimore Eagle, but this past weekend it was dark, with the curtains drawn, lights out and front door locked.

Grand Central and Agora redevelopment projects in Mount Vernon move ahead

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The planned design for City House Charles at 1001-1003 N. Charles Street. Design by SM+P Architects, via CHAP.

Two Mount Vernon redevelopment projects are moving ahead after Baltimore’s preservation commission this week approved designs that will significantly alter a prominent block of N. Charles Street.

Landmark Partners won approval for its plan to build an eight-story office building called City House Charles in place of the Grand Central nightclub at 1001-1003 N. Charles Street. Developers say they have already identified tenants for 100 percent of the office portion.

And Agora Inc. was permitted to transform the former Hynson, Westcott and Dunning building at 1030 N. Charles St., to a new hub for its growing workforce. It will be the 13th building renovated by Agora along the Charles Street corridor, which has become a virtual campus for its employees.

Agora adds another Charles Street landmark to its portfolio

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Photo by Ed Gunts

Bill Bonner is saving another one.

After restoring a dozen historic buildings on and around Mount Vernon Place, Bonner’s firm, Agora Inc., plans to renovate a prominent building in Midtown to house part of its growing staff.

Baltimore Museum of Art shows off a more diverse collection

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Wangechi Mutu’s “Water Woman.” Photo courtesy of the Baltimore Museum of Art.

One year after selling off part of its collection in order to acquire more works by women and artists of color, the Baltimore Museum of Art is showing off some of its purchases.

Directors this week unveiled a new exhibit in the museum’s contemporary wing, entitled “Every Day: Selections from the Collection.” Running until Jan. 5, the show required a complete re-installation of the contemporary collection galleries, the first since 2012, and features works by black artists from the 20th and 21st centuries, including many of the newly acquired pieces.

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