Where Do Marylanders Come From?

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Screen shot 2014-08-17 at 10.29.36 PMIt’s common wisdom that immigration patterns have changed dramatically over the past 100 years–but those changes vary greatly from state to state. While many states have seen an influx of residents from other states, others are seeing much less in-migration. For example, in 1900, only 55 percent of Massachusetts residents had been born in the state; by 2012, the state’s residents were 63 percent Massachusetts-born.

This data comes from a fascinating interactive story from the New York Times, which minutely traces each state’s patterns of migration. So what of Maryland?

Unlike Massachusetts, Maryland has become much more attractive to the non-Maryland-born over the past century or so. In 1900, 81 percent of residents were born in-state; by 2012, that number had shrunk to 48 percent.

For the first half of the century, most Maryland transplants were from Virginia or Pennsylvania; by the end of the century, the bulk of non-native Marylanders were born in D.C.–presumably they got here as soon as they could. (Meanwhile, most non-native-born Virginians are from New York or North Carolina.) Government jobs are a big contributor to Maryland’s growth. As The Times notes, “About 7 percent of employed state natives work for the federal government, compared with 17 percent of employed migrants.”

Another obvious shift is the increase in Marylanders born outside the U.S. In 1900, they made up just 8 percent of the state’s population; by 1950, in the aftermath of World War Two, that amount had dropped to just 4 percent. But these days, a full 15 percent of the state’s residents were born outside the U.S. That’s a significant jump, especially compared with many Midwestern states, which have seen their non-U.S. born populations shrink significantly since 1900.

Some other interesting data points:

Of people living in Maryland in 1900,

+81% were born in Maryland

+8% were born outside the U.S.

+3% were born in Virginia

+3% were born in Pennsylvania

+2% were born in “other states in the Northeast”

+less than 1% each were born in New York, D.C., “other states in the South,” and the Midwest

 

Of people living in Maryland in 2012,

+48% were born in Maryland

+15% were born outside the U.S.

+9% were born in D.C.

+6% were born in “other states in the South”

+5% were born in “other states in the Northeast”

+4% were born in Pennsylvania

+4% were born in New York

+4% were born in “other states in the Midwest”

+3% were born in Virginia

+3% were born in “other states in the West”

 



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