Meet Johns Hopkins’ Next Set of Bloomberg Distinguished Professors

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Photos via the JHU Hub
Photos via the JHU Hub

Johns Hopkins is doing good things with that huge influx of cash given to them by former C-student Michael Bloomberg: They’re using a bunch of it to hire world-class scholars to come to the university as special Bloomberg Distinguished Professors, who will specializing in building bridges between disciplines. Here are the next three to join their ranks:

Patricia Janak (psychological and brain sciences; neuroscience)

Hopkins has plucked Janak away from her current position at the University of California, San Francisco, where she studies the biological basis of behavior and learning, especially as it relates to addiction.
Stephen Morgan (sociology & education)

A lot of great inequality research has come out of Hopkins in recent years, and Morgan is likely to add to the pile. He currently heads the Center for the Study of Inequality at Cornell, where he examines questions about the role higher education plays in success and how policymakers can influence inequality. At Hopkins, he’ll participate in the Institute for the American City, another top-notch interdisciplinary experiment.

Kathleen Sutcliffe (business & patient safety)

You know how groups of people sometimes seem to make worse decisions than individuals? Sutcliffe studies that, with a special emphasis on how health care organizations can make safe, reliable group decisions. Her background in nursing and experience working in the islands off the coast of Alaska well-prepared her to tackle the subject. She’s interested in how “high reliability” groups, like nuclear power companies or air traffic controllers, manage to work in complex, high-risk situations while also (usually) avoiding catastrophe. Do they have special skills or organizational behaviors that can be brought to bear on health care? Sutcliffe will hopefully find that out by working with the Individualized Health Initiative and the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety.



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