Tag: Baltimore Clayworks

Event Pick: Dine from Bowls Made at Baltimore Clayworks to Help Puerto Rico

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Image via flyer from Baltimore Clayworks

After a shutdown and a surprise resurrection, Baltimore Clayworks is back and raising money with community-made bowls.

Baltimore Clayworks Has Dodged Bankruptcy and is Reopening, Community Organizers Say

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Photo via Mount Washington Village Association

Mount Washington’s 37-year-old ceramic arts nonprofit is back from the dead.

Baltimore Clayworks to File for Bankruptcy, Shut Down

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Photo via Mount Washington Village Association

Baltimore Clayworks is calling it quits.

Nonprofit Itineris Pulls Out of $3.7 Million Deal to Buy Baltimore Clayworks’ Buildings in Mount Washington

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Photo via Mount Washington Village Association

The controversial sale of Baltimore Clayworks’ two Mount Washington properties appears to be off.

Baltimore Clayworks Launches Fundraiser to Keep Operating this Summer, Needs $50K

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Photo via Mount Washington Village Association

With a $3.7 million sale in the works for its two buildings on Smith Avenue, ceramics nonprofit Baltimore Clayworks could soon have enough money to once again become financially solvent. However, assuming state officials approve the sale this summer, the group still won’t be receiving any of that money until at least September.

Urban Landscape: The Sandlot Already Looking to Expand; Council Votes on the Overlook, Clayworks; Fells Point’s ‘Caulkers’ Houses’ Recognized; and More

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Photo via the Sandlot

Even though it just opened, Sandlot Baltimore is already looking to expand, upgrade and increase its staff.

Top Stories: The Sandlot Opens at Harbor Point, A Creative Take on a Wedding Itinerary, Woodberry Flip for $417K

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Our most popular story this week was Ed Gunts’ preview writeup about yesterday’s premiere for The Sandlot, the new waterside bar, restaurant and “beach hangout” at Harbor Point. The collaboration between Foodshed LLC and Beatty Development Group has been months in the making. It consists of a largely outdoor dining and entertainment venue with volleyball and bocce courts, a children’s play area, picnic tables, an Airstream trailer and, as the name suggests, bountiful sand.

Visitors can enjoy the comfort of indoor eating and drinking, however, as the bar and kitchen are made from customized shipping containers.

Ed offered this assessment of its ambiance: “It may have its roots in rustic campgrounds and childhood sandlots, but Sandlot also has the sophisticated vibe of the latest generation of rooftop bars in Manhattan that are open to the sky and city views.”

Our other most popular reads from the last seven days:

Mystery Buyer Revealed for Baltimore Clayworks Buildings, as Community Group Still Works to Block the Sale

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Photo via Mount Washington Village Association

The mystery buyer of two Mount Washington buildings owned by Baltimore Clayworks revealed its identity yesterday, even as a community group continued its efforts to delay or cancel the sale.

Opponents of Clayworks Sale: ‘Our Campaign is Continuing’

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Protesters outside Baltimore Clayworks in April.

Community members petitioning for Baltimore Clayworks to forego selling its two historic Mount Washington buildings say they’re not done fighting.

Baltimore Clayworks to Sell Both of its Mount Washington Properties for $3.7 Million

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Photo via Mount Washington Village Association

Four months after Baltimore Clayworks leaders announced plans to sell one or both of their buildings, the organization says it has found a buyer.

Top Stories: One-of-a-Kind Home for Sale in Canton, Riverside Row Home Accidentally Demolished, Rita St. Clair Auctioning Off Pieces of Collection

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Our most-read piece this week was Cynthia McIntyre’s newest Hot House installment about an on-the-market, modern renovation of an old Canton row home that’s been conjoined inside with a neighboring warehouse. The result of the renovation is a pristine two-story, four-bedroom, four-bathroom home with a roof deck and a rare (for the neighborhood) two-car garage.

The project comes from the innovative minds of local developer Building Character, which specializes in contemporary-style transformations. The home sits on the border of Fells Point and Canton, positioning the lucky buyers who can afford its $849,000 price tag with plenty to enjoy in the surrounding neighborhoods.

Here were our other most popular stories this week:

Baltimore Clayworks Rejects Sale-Leaseback Offer for its Gallery Building

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Photo via Mount Washington Village Association

The trustees of Baltimore Clayworks have turned down a purchase offer from a businessman who wants to help the art organization retain at least one of its two buildings in Mount Washington.

Urban Landscape: Kevin Spacey Identified as Buyer of $5.65 Million Inner Harbor Pier Home; Demolition in Mount Vernon; Baltimore Clayworks Agrees to ‘Dialogue’ with Opponents

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Kevin Spacey at the Berlin Film Festival in 2011. Photo via Wikimedia Commons.

Actor Kevin Spacey has been identified as the mystery buyer of the $5.65 million Pier Home at Harborview that sold earlier this year, according to local real estate agents and others familiar with the transaction.

Top Stories: Remembering Late Rapper E-Dubble, Sagamore Pendry Preps for Opening, Luxury Apartment Building Planned for North Roland Park

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The most popular story on our site this week was Marion Winik’s soul-touching tribute to E-dubble, a Philadelphia rapper who lived in Hampden for some time and forged a bond with our columnist’s son, Vince. E-dubble, legally named Evan Wallace, befriended Vince years ago when the latter moved back to Baltimore after he graduated from music school. The towering, prodigious emcee and the recent graduate wound up performing around Baltimore and going on tour. Even after they went separate ways, they remained in touch.

Last month, days after they met up in Philadelphia, Williams was suddenly hospitalized with an infection and fell into a coma. He passed away weeks later.

“I feel the loss as a fan, as a friend, as a mother, as a fellow wordsmith and swimmer in the pool of the English language,” Winik writes. “He was not afraid to write about death. It was all through his work. I only wish we could hear what he would say now.”

Here were our other most-read stories from last weekend through today:

 

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