Tag: dpw

Greenlaurel: Baltimore reservoirs’ Public Enemy No. 1—the Zebra mussel

0
Loch Raven Reservoir Dam. Photo by Laurel Peltier.

A pesky alien shellfish that wreaks havoc on waterways is getting closer and closer to Baltimore’s drinking water reservoirs. Zebra mussels, stowaways from Russia, were found last spring in Hyde’s Quarry in Westminster, Maryland.

“Baltimore’s Department of Public Works has been ever-vigilant about keeping these invaders out, but this was way too close for comfort,” said Clark Howells, Watershed Section manager for Baltimore DPW.

Audit finds 166 city-owned trailers, pumps, tools and other gear ‘untraceable’

0
Water main work by DPW crews. Photo via Baltimore City Department of Public Works/Twitter.

More than 160 vehicles, hand tools and pieces of equipment in the city’s fleet—from a forklift to dozens of pumps used for work on sewer lines, as well as trailers and other gear—have gone missing, according to a newly released audit by the Department of General Services.

Baltimore releases interactive map showing sewage overflows

0
Image via Baltimore DPW

In Baltimore, heavy rain is often accompanied by sewage overflows into the city’s waterways.

The figures often released in the days afterward, with the number of gallons of the toxic mix of wastewater and rainwater–sometimes in the millions–and the location where the overflow happened.

The Baltimore City Department of Public Works is now offering a way to speed up the notification process and track the sewage by map.

After years of high-profile water billing errors, DPW will get independent review of billing process

0

The complaints have piled up: tales from city residents, churches and even the city’s own properties of vastly inflated water bills, glitches following the adoption of a new monthly billing system in 2016, and recent cries for more transparency and accountability from DPW as another three-year water rate hike is set to take effect. Now, Baltimore’s Department of Public Works says it will arrange for an independent review of its billing system.

DPW employee installed pirating software, apps to view porn on city computer

0
Photo by Wally Gobetz, via Flickr

A former computer support employee for Baltimore’s Department of Public Works was using a city-owned computer for a variety of extracurricular and forbidden purposes, including piracy, watching porn and political campaign activity, according to Baltimore’s inspector general.

Days after approval of three-year, 30 percent water rate hike, DPW shares the math behind it

1
Photo by Joe Shlabotnik, via Flickr

In an act of belated transparency, Baltimore City’s Department of Public Works this morning released the results of a contracted study on its newly approved, 10 percent annual water rate increases extending through June of 2022.

How Council President Young’s income-based water billing legislation would work

0
Photo by Wally Gobetz, via Flickr

The president of the Baltimore City Council is introducing legislation tonight to help some of the city’s low- and moderate-income households with paying their water and sewer bills, and to create a new avenue for customers to resolve billing disputes and errors.

DPW plans another water rate hike; Council president to introduce income-based billing legislation

1

Baltimore city plans to continue hiking its water and sewer rates for the next three years, while also raising the so-called “rain tax,” in a first, to help pay for ongoing water infrastructure repairs.

This week’s storms sent at least 9.8 million gallons of sewage into Baltimore waterways—and more is coming

0
Photo by Ethan McLeod

Baltimore’s sewer system was not made to withstand the increasingly severe weather patterns and human waste volumes of the 21st century, as evidenced by the clockwork-like outflows of poopy water into the Jones Falls, Gwynns Falls and other waterways every time the city sees heavy rains. This sadly remained true for the last six days, when pummeling rainstorms sent at least 9.8 million gallons of mixed sewage and rainwater overflowing into local streams and the harbor.

Responding to activists, Mayor Pugh, DPW director assure they don’t want to privatize Baltimore’s water system

0
Photo by Joe Shlabotnik, via Flickr

Fear not, Mayor Catherine Pugh and Baltimore City Department of Public Works Director Rudy Chow say: Baltimore’s water system will remain in public control, despite any charter amendments that activists worry could open up a pathway for privatization.

Guides