Tag: history

People in the Past Just Looked Cooler

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Don’t believe me? Take a quick scan through my favorite blog of the week, Hopkins Retrospective, which features all sorts of cool visual history, from World War Two-era operating rooms to Gertrude Stein in the library to handsome lacrosse players from 1889 (above). Those mustaches! Those surly stares! A few more highlights below the jump:

Baltimore Went Wild Over the Orioles of 1894

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Champion Orioles of 1894 Lying on the ground are: John McGraw and Willie Keeler. Front row: “Kid” Bill Gleason, Joe Kelly, Ned Hanlon, Wilbert Robinson, Bill Hoffer, and Hughie Jennings. Second row: Walter Brody, Henry Reitz, John McMahon, Frank Bowerman, and Artie Pool. Third row: Arthur Clarkson, George Hemming, George Carey and Bill Clark.
Champion Orioles of 1894
Lying on the ground are: John McGraw and Willie Keeler. Front row: “Kid” Bill Gleason, Joe Kelly, Ned Hanlon, Wilbert Robinson, Bill Hoffer, and Hughie Jennings. Second row: Walter Brody, Henry Reitz, John McMahon,
Frank Bowerman, and Artie Pool. Third row: Arthur Clarkson, George Hemming, George Carey and Bill Clark.

Courtesy of Ghosts of Baltimore – The Orioles and baseball go back a long way with the city of Baltimore. Before the current O’s arrived in 1954, there were earlier teams of the same name.

1894 Orioles flag

1894 Orioles flag

We came across an interesting article in The Baltimore Sun from August 15th, 1920 detailing the wild celebrations following the Orioles success in the 1894 pennant race. Below is the article.

The shades of night were falling fast in Baltimore on Tuesday, September 25, 1894, when a telegram was flashed from Cleveland to all corners of this land. There was nothing much to that telegram, merely the statement:

Baltimore, 14; Cleveland, 9.

Drunk Horse-Driving, a Mencken Mystery, and More Strange Baltimore History

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Do you follow the various Baltimore history blogs that are out there? If you don’t, you’re missing out on a lot of great historical weirdness.

Charm City History recently posted about how much lawbreakers had to pay for violating various city ordinances in 19th century Baltimore. The figures are in 2013 dollars, for comparison purposes:

  • Throwing stones in public – FINED, $27
  • Running wagons without license numbers – FINED, $27-$50
  • Improper conduct in the presence of ladies – FINED, $121
  • Throwing a nuisance in the street – FINED, $27
  • Killing or attempting to kill, or in any manner injure or molest sparrows, robins, wrens, or other small insectivorous birds in the city of Baltimore, to include their birdhouses – FINE, $85 per offense

Non-Profit Preserves Baltimore’s Heritage for Future Generations

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Johns Hopkins, Executive Director of Baltimore Heritage, in front of the former American Ice Company plant. Photo by Steve Ruark.
Johns Hopkins, Executive Director of Baltimore Heritage, in front of the former American Ice Company plant. Photo by Steve Ruark.

Courtesy Bmore Media – The Sellers Mansion at Lafayette Square in west Baltimore Harlem Park neighborhood had once been one of the grandest homes in Baltimore. Today, it is decaying from neglect.

When nonprofit Baltimore Heritage discovered that the square was the site of a Civil War army hospital that accommodated 1,000 patients, it organized an architectural dig at which hundreds turned out.

A Flag as Big as a House!

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BALTIMORE, July 2, 2013: At a 11:30 am celebration at Ft. McHenry National Monument and Shrine on July 4, The Maryland Historical Society (MdHS) will begin recreating the 30 x 42 foot Star-Spangled Banner flag that inspired the writing of our national anthem. The flag is an authentic reproduction of the original and will take more than 100 volunteer stitchers six weeks to complete. The start of the project will be heralded with great fanfare by canon fire and living history re-enactors in 1812 era dress including the ‘first stitch’ sewn by Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake.

Gentrification, Recycling, or Something Else? An Interview with Antero Pietila

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courtesy Greenmount AvenueAntero Pietila worked his way across the Atlantic on a freighter from Finland in 1964. He joined The Baltimore Sun in 1969. He is the author of the Baltimore City Paper’s 2010 Best Book about Baltimore Not in My Neighborhood: The Story of How Bigotry Shaped a Great American City.

Greenmount Avenue: The area that comprises Station North was once an industrial area due to easy access to the Baltimore Belt Line. The building that is now known as the Copy Cat (1501 Guilford) was part of the Crown Cork and Seal Company, right? I know that the building that is now known as Area 405 (405 E. Oliver) manufactured air-dryers and foam rubber at different times in its history. Did these manufacturers have any role in the construction of the homes in Barclay below North Ave? Were these homes available for African-Americans and/or Jewish-Americans?

Maryland Historical Society’s Betsy Bonaparte Exhibit Opens Sunday, June 9

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Madame Jerome Bonaparte - Pastel on Paper, c. 1856 by George D'Almaine, after Gilbert Stuart's triple portrait
Madame Jerome Bonaparte – Pastel on Paper, c. 1856
by George D’Almaine, after Gilbert Stuart’s triple portrait

This weekend, the much anticipated Maryland Historical Society exhibit “Woman of Two Worlds: Elizabeth Patterson Bonaparte and Her Quest for an Imperial Legacy” opens.  In celebration of the exhibition, the Maryland Historical Society is hosting a Bonaparte Ball at the Garrett-Jacobs Mansion on Saturday, June 8 at 7pm. And later that evening, from 9 pm-1 am, the Young Defenders of the Maryland Historical Society are hosting an Afterparty to the Bonaparte Ball called Fashionably Late.  (For more information call 410-685-3750 x399.)

Much has been written about Madame Jerome Bonaparte — also known as Betsy — who, as a gorgeous 18-year-old, set the gossipmongers atwitter with her revealing empire dresses at local society events. Her marriage to Napoleon Bonaparte’s younger brother Jerome became an international drama. Whether in Europe or in Baltimore she always caused a stir with her renowned beauty and wit. Even at ninety-four, Elizabeth was still making news as one of America’s richest women. But despite a life of celebrity and financial success, she lived with unfulfilled imperial dreams.

Garnet tiara worn by Betsy Patterson Bonaparte, circa 1803.
Garnet tiara worn by Betsy Patterson Bonaparte, circa 1803.

With hundreds of objects and reams of documents, the Maryland Historical Society is the official keeper of Elizabeth’s memory. On view from June 9, 2013 – June 9, 2014, the “Woman of Two Worlds:” Elizabeth Patterson Bonaparte and Her Quest for an Imperial Legacy exhibit marks the first time the Maryland Historical Society has featured a exhibition exclusively devoted to a historical female figure.

Hours/Admission

Museum hours are Wednesday through Sunday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. As of June 9, General admission to the Maryland Historical Society is $9 for adults, $5 for students and children ages 3-18 and free for children under 3. For more information, visit www.mdhs.org

When Johns Hopkins and Abraham Lincoln Were Pen Pals

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Well, “pen pals” might be stretching it — the Library of Congress’ online collection of Lincoln correspondence contains only one letter from Hopkins to the then-president, dated 1862. As you may have heard, that was a rough time for Lincoln — and Hopkins, a pro-Union big wig in Baltimore, had some advice to give.

Can you Help the Maryland Historical Society Identify The People in These Pictures?

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Here’s an interesting event we just came across in our overstuffed inbox: the Maryland Historical Society is asking the public for help identifying thousands of photographs in its possession and holding a reception for a look at the pictures to see what you know.  Please pass on the word and sorry for the late notice. -The Eds.

Courtesy the Maryland Historical Society – On Sunday, April 7 at 2 pm, you’re invited to take part in “Revisiting Our Past: Identifying Paul Henderson’s Photographs of the African-American Community in Maryland, ca. 1935-1965.”

There are over 6,000 photographs in the Paul Henderson Photograph Collection,many of which are still unidentified. So we need your help to collect names of individuals and memories from this era.

We encourage you to invite your friends, neighbors, and relatives to this afternoon of reminiscence. You never know, you could see your friends from high school, your parents when they were young, and famous Marylanders (we recently identified Thurgood Marshall in one photo!)

For our April 7 event, Paul Henderson’s entire collection has been printed as reference photos and placed in three-ring notebooks that will be presented along with identification forms. Those in attendance will be attempting to identify thousands of unidentified faces and places in Henderson’s photos. Light refreshments will be served.

This event is sponsored in part by the Pierians Incorporated, Baltimore Chapter, who approached MdHS’s Special Collections department with the idea for the event. Student facilitators from the history departments of University of Maryland Baltimore County, Johns Hopkins University, Towson University, Morgan State University, and Sojourner-Douglass College will be on hand to facilitate this history-recording event.

Paul Henderson (1899-1988) was an African-American photographer who worked in Baltimore from the 1930s to 1960s. Most of his career was spent at the Afro-Americannewspaper where he documented significant events and everyday life in Baltimore’s African-American communities, leaving behind a collection of over 6,000 photographs.

The exhibit, Paul Henderson: Baltimore’s Civil Rights Era in Photographs, ca. 1940-1960 has been on display in the Hackerman gallery since February 2012. A selection of Henderson photos will be installed in Baltimore’s City Hall this May.

Space is limited; please RSVP as soon as possible to [email protected] or call: 410-685-3750 x377. See you there!

Hey, Baltimore — Feel Like Solving a Mystery?

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Z9.584.PP8 Detective room, Police Department

The Maryland Historical Society Library has uncovered a disturbing photo — or, at least, an apparently disturbing photo. A crowd of masked men in dark suits and bowler  hats cluster in the corner of the room, staring at a black man who’s standing on a kind of podium. The atmosphere is one of anticipation, of something on the brink of happening — but what? The MHSL archivists have no idea. “What is happening to this man? Why are the men wearing masks? Are they police officers? Are they a jury? Stare a little longer and other questions arise: What year would this be? Why are two of the men seen above not wearing masks? Why does the African-American man seem so calm?” a MHSL representative writes on their blog. And because their own experts (and a few that they imported) haven’t been able to solve the mystery yet, they’re turning to the public. So, what do you think? See any clues?

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