Tag: leadership

New Initiatives and an Invitation from RPCS Head of School Caroline Blatti

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A note to the Baltimore Community from Caroline Blatti -RPCS Head of School:

When I began in my new position as Head of School at RPCS on July 1, 2016, I embarked on a journey that would take me through a full academic cycle, as well as the ever-turning seasons of the year.

Jenna Bush Hager to Speak in Howard County

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She used to live in South Baltimore and famously had her Trek mountain bike stolen from her garage. She later moved to New York, where she’s a correspondent for the Today show.

Big Fish Q&A with Maryland Delegate Heather Mizeur

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Gubernatorial candidate Del. Heather Mizeur’s platform is so unapologetically progressive, it makes some of her fellow Maryland Democrats look downright right wing. Her position on marijuana is to outright legalize it. She proposes a broader expansion of pre-kindergarten programs and a higher minimum wage increase than either of her party rivals, Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown and Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler. And her stance against hydraulic fracturing in the state is utterly unambiguous.

JHU Coach Is One of Fortune’s “50 Greatest Leaders in the World”

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Photo via Johns Hopkins/Fortune
Photo via Johns Hopkins/Fortune

Quick, name some inspiring leaders from around the world. If you picked the Dalai Lama or Pope Francis, you’re spot on; both men made it onto Fortune‘s list of the world’s 50 greatest leaders for 2014. But do you know who else did? George Kennedy, Johns Hopkins swimming coach.

Meet the New Head of the Contemporary, Deana Haggag

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Photo courtesy of fabempire.com.
Photo courtesy of Olivia Obineme

At 26, many young adults are just starting to figure out what they want to do with their lives, or at least how the heck they’re going to support themselves. Then there’s Deana Haggag. In June of 2013, the 26-year-old was appointed director of the newly named and recently re-opened Contemporary. The former Contemporary Museum had suspended operations in May of 2012 after failing to raise funds for a new location. A newly minted graduate of MICA’s master’s degree program in curatorial studies, Haggag stepped up to head the museum, which is now nomadic. Sans a brick and mortar location, it will focus on presenting experiential art throughout the Baltimore community via collaborative programming with a variety of artists. In other words, it’s up to Haggag to steer this anchor-less ship in a fiscally responsible manner while delivering contemporary art experiences that will attract and energize audiences. Recently, I caught up with Haggag to find out how this bright, witty twenty-something plans to execute such a lofty plan.

You were an art history and philosophy major at Rutgers before pursuing your MFA at MICA in curatorial studies. Are you a practicing artist, a champion and appreciator of art, or both?

I am definitely not a practicing artist. I can barely write my name legibly. I happen to love the arts. I love defending the arts. When I applied to art school, I also applied to law school. Art school was a pipe dream. People told me lawyers aren’t getting jobs, there are too many lawyers, so you may as well do something you love.

As part of your master’s degree thesis, you worked with Gallery CA, a 90-unit artist residence in the Station North Arts and Entertainment District, to better define the mission of the gallery for its residents and the broader community. Elaborate on that a little, and explain how that experience prepared you for this position.

City Arts is the building where Gallery-CA lives; it’s one of the first models of subsidized housing for artists. When the gallery was built, it didn’t have a solid plan for how it would work. When I went to school at MICA to study curatorial arts, someone had pitched activating the space. I worked closely with the building’s owners, and the larger Baltimore arts community, toward this goal.

MICA Announces New President

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MICA's new president, Samuel Hoi.
MICA’s new president, Samuel Hoi.

The Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) Board of Trustees today announced Samuel Hoi as the next president in the College’s 188-year history, effective July 1, 2014. Hoi is currently president of Otis College of Art and Design, in Los Angeles. He will succeed President Fred Lazarus IV, who will step down after 36 years.

In selecting Hoi, the board noted his bold steps to highlight art and design’s tangible impact, as evidenced by the annual Otis Report on the Creative Economy produced under his direction, and his efforts to position Otis students as community engagement leaders through the launch of the Creative Action: An Integrated Learning Program curriculum model. Under Hoi’s leadership, enrollment at Otis increased as much as 34 percent, operating resources have more than doubled and the endowment has more than tripled, attributable in part to a 200 percent increase in individual donors.

Catholic Relief Services Director Talks About the Business of Charity

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Recently named one of the “top 500 most important people on the planet” by Foreign Policy magazine, Carolyn Woo took the reins in 2012 as head of Catholic Relief Services, headquartered in Baltimore.  As the official Catholic international humanitarian aid organization, (Catholic Charities is domestic) Catholic Relief Services has over 5,000 employees in 91 countries serving more than 100 million people annually. Its mission  — based on need, without regard to race, nationality or religion — is to “promote human development by responding to major emergencies, fighting poverty, and nurturing peaceful and just societies.” With annual revenues of $823 million, CRS is currently 39th on the Forbes list of the largest U.S. charities. Its offices, at 228 W. Lexington Street, are in what was once Stewart’s department store.

Dr. Woo came to CRS from the University of Notre Dame (not to be confused with Notre Dame of Maryland University on Charles Street) where she served for 12 years as the Dean of the Mendoza College of Business. While there, she brought the undergraduate business school up to its current number one ranking (Bloomberg Businessweek) while maintaining its Catholic mission. Her expertise in the areas of corporate strategy, entrepreneurship, and management bring a new, more financially-based perspective to the enormous and far-reaching charity.

Dr. Woo has an interesting personal story as well. Born and raised in Hong Kong, she attended a Catholic school run by the Maryknoll Sisters, American nuns who devoted their lives to overseas service.  Influenced by these women, she came to America against the wishes of her family, having raised on her own the money for one year of schooling. She attended Purdue University, where, after the first year, she won a scholarship for international students, and graduated with highest honors with an undergraduate degree in economics.  She stayed on at Purdue to earn a masters degree and a Ph.D., as well.

Getting to the Heart of It: Q & A With Art-With-A-Heart Exec. Dir. Randi Pupkin

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Randi Alper Pupkin
Randi Alper Pupkin and Thomas Kohn.

Courtesy Citybizlist – Approximately fourteen years ago, Randi Pupkin gave up her career as an active and successful litigation attorney to found and work full time for Art with a Heart. Today, the not-for-profit organization with a stated mission of “enhancing the lives of people in need through visual art,” is responsible for programing more than 7,100 separate art classes on an annual basis and has countless stories of  “steering lives on the proper path” through building strong and life-long relationships with its students.

Q. Fair to say that practicing law full time wasn’t your passion?
A. I affectionately refer to myself as a runaway attorney. I made a go of it for almost 14 years and even had my own firm for half of my law career. For the most part, practicing law, for me, was a grind and I truly think the civil court system is broken. Still, I learned a great deal about how to navigate certain experiences and situations that I would never have had but for my practice.  These lessons are invaluable to my every day work.

Read more at Citybizlist

Community Leader and Philanthropist Sidney Silber Dies at 95

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Sidney Silber

Sidney Silber died on Tuesday, July 30 at the age of 95. In tribute to this lifelong Baltimorean, community leader and philanthropist, we re-publish today two previous Baltimore Fishbowl articles about him. The first is one in a series of profiles of vibrant Baltimoreans over 80, titled “8 over 80.” The second is from our garden blog: “How Does Your Garden Show?” Sidney Silber’s accomplishments in business and real estate were equaled by his accomplishment at home, where he and his wife Jean created one of the finest gardens in Maryland. We extend our deepest sympathy to Jean, their children Janet, Douglas and Paul and to their beloved grandchildren. – The Eds.

8 Over 80

Sidney Silber 

Originally published November 8, 2011 –
D.O.B: January 12, 1918, Baltimore, Maryland Education: Baltimore Polytechnic Institute ’35
M.I.T. ’39  (Tau Beta Pi Engineering Honorary Society) Service: Non-military, high-priority defense work as experimental flight test engineer for Boeing Aircraft Company, Seattle, Washington, 1939-1946 Career, Present and Past:
Sidney Silber, at 93, is still fully engaged in his art and horticulture, two of three passionate, long-running avocations. (Racing sailboats in Annapolis is the third, from which he now takes leave.) All have paralleled his three careers as engineer, bakery president and commercial real estate developer.Silber pursues drawing and painting with devotion — he drew well as a child and honed the skill in mechanical drawing courses at Poly, M.I.T., and at Boeing where he did flight analysis. There he flew on 50 test flights, including those of the B-17 and the first pressurized military airplane, the B-29, which was designed to carry the atom bomb.

After the death of his father and brother, Silber returned to Baltimore in 1946. Using engineering and increasing real estate acumen, he expanded the now-legendary family business, Silber Bakeries, to 25 shops. After leaving the business in 1962, he founded Commercial and Industrial Realty Corporation and for 27 years developed residential, commercial and industrial properties.

The proceeds from the sales of those properties created the Jean and Sidney Silber Foundation. Today cultural and educational institutions, as well as Baltimore non-profits focused on education and poverty, occupy much of his interest, philanthropy and time.

So does horticulture. “We had no garden on Monroe Street,” he says of the home where he and seven siblings grew up above the bakery.  In 1959 he and his wife Jean combined energy, intellect, artistic and engineering talent to begin a six-acre masterpiece in Lutherville. Fifty-two years later it is considered one the finest gardens in Maryland and the U.S.

While he officially retired in 1990, Silber never stopped working. In khaki pants and oxford cloth shirt, he is found early in the morning and late in the afternoon, with a folding pruning saw and clippers, tending his “living work of art” that draws visitors on private tours from all over the country to see the garden and hear its botanically expert owners lecture.

Among many sculptures in the garden are several of his own, all bronze. (His sculpture is also in the collections of M.I.T. and Goucher College.) Besides collecting art, his current passion is portrait painting. Many line the walls of his studio off the garden.

Key to longevity of engagement: “Shall I say, a young wife?” he laughs. “Jeannie keeps me going…. I think you should always be a student,” says the man, just back from a painting class, who studied law at Boeing, real estate and finance in the bakery business and art, horticulture and history for as long as he can remember. “Physical activity is important too.”

Current challenge: In the art: “Drawing it well, mixing the colors right… I draw. I paint. My eyesight is good, but I still can’t see what I’m supposed to see.” In the garden: “What to do with the garden in the future.” In philanthropy:  “How to make the decisions every year.”

Women Are Taking Over Baltimore’s Art Institutions

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This week, the Walters Art Museum welcomed its new director, Julia Marciari-Alexander. Marciari-Alexander replaces Gary Vikan, a 27-year veteran of the institution, and joins Doreen Bolger (director of the Baltimore Museum of Art) and Rebecca Hoffberger (director of the American Visionary Art Museum) to make a trifecta of badass women in charge of the city’s largest art institutions.

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