Tag: reading series

Don’t Miss Fiction at Freddie’s on Monday

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"Glen Burnie Fair," circa 1980 -- by Jennifer Bishop
“Glen Burnie Fair,” circa 1980 — by Jennifer Bishop

MONDAY, Nov. 11 at 7 p.m. at Freddies Ale House, enjoy a complimentary light buffet and cool reading/presentation array from local greats. 7209 Harford Road.

Who’s reading at first-ever event? Poet Dan Cuddy; Roots of Steel author Deborah Rudacille; photographer Jennifer Bishop to present and talk about her beloved Baltimore street shots; and News-American journalist Michael Olesker.

This is the launch of a new reading series in Baltimore: “Greektown 2012 Reading Series had a baby and they named it Freddie,” says Baltimore scribe Rafael Alvarez, the evening’s host.
See you there!

Lit Parade’s Special Spring Issue: Sterritt on Spike Lee, Michalski’s Magic Streak, van den Berg in “Vogue,” and More

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image courtesy of http://bigmediavandal.blogspot.com/2013/01/unchained-melody-two-troublemakin.html
image courtesy of Big Media Vandalism

IVY10-e1350927055992Here’s the latest installment of Baltimore writer Joseph Martin’s Ivy Bookshop-sponsored column for the Baltimore Fishbowl, “The Lit Parade,” a celebration and thoughtful examination of the epic local lit scene that too often goes unreported, unread.

In the world of academic analysis, few things madden quite like trying to treat an artist’s entire oeuvre.  And that goes double for movie directors: even amongst the most stylish and singular of moviedom’s “auteurs,” like David Lynch or Quentin Tarantino, there are head-scratching incongruities (Lynch’s The Straight Story), conceptual clunkers (Lynch’s Wild at Heart, the Tarantino-scripted From Dusk ‘Til Dawn), money-grabs (Lynch’s Dune), or simple toss-offs (Tarantino’s smug addition to Four Rooms) with which to contend.  Unlike a painter or a writer, a director’s vision is subservient to cast, crew, funds, marketability, etc. — he or she is in a true artistic bind: a movie has to be sellable, critically viable, and a financial “hit” in order for a director to even keep making art.  What gets made is, ultimately, what can get made, a problem that’s led to many a messy, difficult-to-parse film corpus.

The Baltimore Lit Parade for September: “Big Ray,” & Bold New Poetry

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We’re pleased to present writer Joseph Martin’s new Ivy Bookshop-sponsored column for the Baltimore Fishbowl, “The Lit Parade,” a celebration and thoughtful examination of the epic local lit scene that too often goes unreported, unread.

“For my dead dad” reads the dedication to local novelist Michael Kimball’s excellent new book, Big Ray (Bloomsbury) – a heavy, final-sounding thud of a phrase if there ever was one.  And why not?  After four novels stuffed with death, familial friction, and an almost scientific interest in the protocol for (and detritus of) relationships, Big Ray feels like the end product of a long, difficult birthing process, a merger between the post-suicide bricolage of 2008’s Dear Everybody (Alma Books) and the slow, procedural mortality of 2011’s Us (Tyrant Books).  Like those books, Ray presents a precise catalog of mourning; skipping their likeable victims, however, the novel instead turns its fictive eye on an unsympathetic corpse – an abusive, selfish father – allowing Kimball to write with a previously untapped range of emotion and intimacy.

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