Bret McCabe

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Eze Jackson combats holiday season stress with Dirty Christmas

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Image via “The Whole Bushel” on Facebook

Versatile Baltimore MC and Real News Network reporter Eze Jackson stands in the local nonprofit news organization’s recording studio looking over some lyrics he’s penned in a spiral notebook.

As studio manager Dwayne Gladden and audio engineer Stephen Frank go over a few things in the control booth, Jackson nods his head along as he mentally reads through his lines, jotting down a few notes in the process. I’ve dropped by to chat with Jackson about his fourth annual Dirty Christmas party taking place at the Metro Gallery Dec. 29, but first he needs to hop into the booth to record a short experiment, an attempt to bring Jackson’s considerable hip-hop gifts to the kinds of news stories the Real News covers: economic inequality, climate change, political corruption.

Stillpointe’s ‘Heathers: The Musical’ stages the darkly comic ’80s flick as a rock concert

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From left to right, Shannen Doherty, Lisanne Falk, Kim Walker and Winona Ryder in the film “Heathers.” Image via IMDB.

Stillpointe Theatre co-founder, actor and director Danielle Robinette is herding her cast and orchestra together in a church basement for the sitzprobe of “Heathers: The Musical,” Laurence O’Keefe and Kevin Murphy’s 2014 adaptation of the darkly comic 1989 cult film. The cast members of Stillpointe’s production, which opens Dec. 20 at the Ottobar for the first of three¬†nights, mill about checking their phones, flipping through copies of the book and doing some vocal warm-ups.

‘John Waters: Indecent Exposure’ highlights the auteur’s intellectual savvy

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Image courtesy of the Baltimore Museum of Art.

She Shoulda Said ‘No!’ was a 1949 exploitation film in the “Reefer Madness” mold, designed to warn red-blooded, young Americans about the moral rot, social deviancy and sexual degeneracy that comes with using drugs. In it, a young woman’s experiments with weed lead her into a wayward spiral of selling drugs, losing her job and promiscuity, her moral downfall pushing her brother to suicide. Only after cleaning up in jail and collaborating with authorities can she right her way in life.

Exit Interview: Kwame Kwei-Armah reflects on his time at Center Stage, his upcoming play on Stax Records and more

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Image courtesy of Center Stage.

Over the course of Kwame Kwei-Armah’s seven-year run as artistic director, Baltimore Center Stage regulars have grown accustomed to seeing him walking around during previews, those first few times a production is performed before an audience. The tall, lean, and handsome Kwei-Armah can typically be found dapperly attired and casually milling about, as if just another theatergoer on a night out. On Saturday, prior to the second preview of “Soul: The Stax Musical,” his final directing effort of his tenure, he stood in the lobby surrounded by a small throng of people, chatting and having a laugh.

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