Marcus Dieterle

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Marcus Dieterle is the associate editor of Baltimore Fishbowl. He has returned to Baltimore after working as the deputy editor of the Cecil Whig newspaper in Elkton, Maryland. Before that, he served as the editor-in-chief of The Towerlight. Marcus graduated from Towson University in 2018 with his bachelor's degree in journalism and political science. He can be reached at [email protected]

Officials break ground on Lexington Market with vision balancing tradition, transformation

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Photo via Gov. Larry Hogan’s office.

The makeover of Lexington Market began on Tuesday as state and city officials broke ground on the project to reconstruct downtown Baltimore’s 238-year-old public market.

Updating the market will be part of building Baltimore “better and stronger for the future,” said Baltimore Mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young, who envisioned a day when tourists from across the country will flock to the city to visit the new Lexington Market.

“Lexington Market’s next chapter represents an incredible opportunity for our city, and it is essential that we support the equitable redevelopment and revitalization of this economic hub for delicious food and homegrown entrepreneurship as we continue to grow Baltimore,” he said.

Pugh attorneys seek 1 year, 1 day in prison for ‘Healthy Holly’ scandal, citing personal toll of case

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Former Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh exits the United States District Court in Baltimore on Nov. 21, 2019, after pleading guilty to four counts — one each of conspiracy and fraud and two counts of tax evasion. (Ian Round/Capital News Service).

Attorneys for former Mayor Catherine Pugh are asking for a sentence of one year and one day in prison–nearly three years fewer than the sentence U.S. prosecutors are seeking.

In a sentencing memorandum Friday, Pugh’s attorneys asked for leniency in sentencing the former mayor for her crimes, based on her having already and continuing to suffer damage to her reputation, emotional distress, and economic loss due to the fraudulent behavior tied to sales and donations related to her “Healthy Holly” children’s book series.

“Ms. Pugh’s fall from grace, public humiliation, and front-page national disgrace are powerful and significant punishments,” her attorneys wrote. “She has already paid an extraordinary price for her conduct. As a result of her actions, she has lost everything that she has and everything she worked toward. She will be saddled with forfeiture and restitution orders that will hamper her financially for the remaining years of her life. She will lose her house and everything that she owns.”

Todd Carter named permanent Baltimore IT director after serving in interim role

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Photo via Wikimedia Commons

Baltimore City has a permanent information technology director after Mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young promoted the acting director, who has been serving in that position since October, according to a news release from the mayor’s office Thursday.

In a bit of a trial by fire, Todd A. Carter started working in the Baltimore City Office of Information & Technology (BCIT) on May 7, the same day a ransomware attack compromised Baltimore city government’s computer network.

The BCIT director at the time, Frank Johnson, went on leave in September and resigned from his post in October.

Community groups raise concerns over 79-space parking lot proposed for Druid Hill Park

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An aerial rendering of the planned renovations to the Druid Hill Aquatic Center. Image courtesy of Baltimore City Recreation and Parks.

A plan to update the swimming pool at Druid Hill Park is drawing community support, but some residents are questioning the need for a 79-space parking lot.

The Druid Hill Aquatic Center is slated to undergo renovations to its main pools and mechanical systems and add a new bathhouse and kiddie splash pool. But the project would also add dozens parking spaces around the tennis courts across East Drive from the aquatic center, leaving several community groups concerned about the safety of pedestrians and cyclists amidst increased vehicle traffic.

Mayor challenges transportation workers to fill 5,000 potholes in 50 days

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Mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young uses a shovel to spread asphalt over a pothole before packing it down. Image courtesy of Charm TV Baltimore.

There was one fewer pothole in Baltimore Wednesday morning after Mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young packed asphalt into one on N. Collington Avenue in East Baltimore, kicking off a challenge for transportation workers to fill 5,000 potholes over the next 50 days.

The 50-day pothole challenge is the latest piece of Young’s “Clean It Up!” campaign, which he launched last month, to beautify Baltimore.

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