City releases map of food distribution sites accessible during coronavirus pandemic

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A map shows more than 50 food distribution sites throughout Baltimore City. Map by Baltimore City.

Children, older adults and other food insecure families can now pick up meals at more than 50 designated meal sites throughout Baltimore City.

Baltimore City government has compiled a map of grab-and-go food sites located at recreation centers, schools and senior centers.

The map denotes recreation centers with blue pins, schools with yellow pins and senior centers with magenta pins.

“Identification or personal information will not be requested at food distribution sites. This is not a public benefit that would be considered in public charge decisions,” a notice on the map site said.

Children can pick up breakfast and lunch from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at any of the city schools distribution sites. They can pick up snacks beginning at 2 p.m. and dinner from 5-7 p.m. at any of the recreation center sites, the notice said.

Baltimore City Public Schools began providing free breakfast and lunch to children at 10 food distribution sites on Monday.

Those sites, featured on the map, include:

  • Sandtown-Winchester Achievement Academy
    701 Gold St.
    (410) 396-0800
  • Dorothy I. Height Elementary School
    2011 Linden Ave.
    (410) 396-0837
  • Alexander Hamilton Elementary School
    800 Poplar Grove St.
    (410) 396-0520
  • The Historic Cherry Hill Elementary/Middle School
    801 Bridgeview Road
    (410) 396-1392
  • Yorkwood Elementary School
    5931 Yorkwood Road
    (410) 396-6364
  • John Ruhrah Elementary/Middle School
    701 Rappolla St.
    (410) 396-9125
  • Arlington Elementary School
    3705 W. Rogers Ave.
    (410) 396-0567
  • Beechfield Elementary/Middle School
    301 S. Beechfield Ave.
    (410) 396-0525
  • Sinclair Lane Elementary School
    3880 Sinclair Lane
    (410) 396-9117
  • Paul Laurence Dunbar High School
    1400 Orleans St.
    (443) 642-4478

Meals at school food distribution sites will be provided in the form of takeout and grab-and-go packages to limit people’s contact with large groups, City Schools CEO Sonja Brookins Santelises said Friday.

Baltimore City Department of Recreation and Parks suspended recreation programs, rentals, permitted events and recreation facilities services from Monday through March 27. However, the agency will be providing food at city recreation centers:

 

State Superintendent of Schools Karen Salmon said breakfast, lunch and dinner will be available at 138 meal sites throughout Maryland. Those sites can be viewed at mdsummermeals.org.

A group of Baltimore residents have also created a document in which people can sign up to receive support or volunteer to help those in need of assistance by buying groceries, picking up prescriptions and accomplishing other tasks during the coronavirus pandemic.

As of 10 a.m. Monday, there were a total of 37 cases of the coronavirus confirmed in Maryland, according to the Maryland Department of Health’s Maryland COVID-19 Case Map Dashboard.

Since then, Frederick County has confirmed its first case of the coronavirus.

Baltimore City also confirmed its second positive case of COVID-19, involving a woman in her 20s, Mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young announced Monday afternoon.

“Everyone in Baltimore City has to take seriously the need to practice social distancing, in additional to increased hand washing,” Young said. “This virus is not a joke and the quicker we have maximum participation from our residents, the better for everyone. We will continue to take aggressive measures to slow the spread of COVID-19, but we need the public’s help.”

Gov. Larry Hogan ordered all bars and restaurants in Maryland to close, effective 5 p.m. Monday, to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

Food service establishments are allowed to continue drive-through, carryout and food delivery operations, and grocery stores will remain open, Hogan said Monday.

Nationwide, there have been at least 4,281 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the United States, including at least 74 deaths and 17 recoveries, as of 4:30 p.m. Monday, according to a real-time dashboard created by Johns Hopkins University’s Center for Systems Science and Engineering.

Marcus Dieterle


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