Tag: bernard c jack young

Hogan, Young, Democratic state legislators continue back-and-forth comments about violent crime in Baltimore

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Gov. Larry Hogan announces the redesignation of the bills in his violent crime package as emergency legislation Thursday. Photo courtesy of Governor’s Office.

Frustrated with the lack of movement on proposals he submitted to combat violent crime in Baltimore, Gov. Larry Hogan redesignated the four bills as emergency legislation today, saying “there can be no more excuses or delays” for not taking action.

“We need to stop playing politics,” he said at a press conference today. “Pass these bills, get them to my desk so I can sign them and we can begin. Stop the killings and get these violent shooters and murderers off the streets and behind bars so that the people of Baltimore can take back their communities once and for all.”

Mayor builds on ‘Clean It Up!’ campaign with initiatives to enhance vacant lots, reduce illegal dumping

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Baltimore City hopes to repurpose and beautify vacant lots like this one with the help of community organizations as part of Mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young’s “Clean It Up!” campaign. Photo via Green Network Plan/Baltimore City Department of Planning.

Mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young rolled out the latest additions to his “Clean It Up!” campaign today, including initiatives aimed at repurposing and beautifying some of the city’s vacant lots and surveilling frequently used illegal dumping sites.

Young first launched the campaign last month, branding it an “all-hands-on-deck” effort to clean up “crime and grime” in Baltimore.

Young fires back at Hogan’s comments over violent crime in Baltimore

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In a press conference Wednesday, Baltimore Mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young discusses recent comments made by Maryland Governor Larry Hogan regarding violent crime in Baltimore. Image courtesy of Charm TV Baltimore.

Mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young today pushed back against recent criticism from Gov. Larry Hogan over violent crime, saying the city is still waiting for state resources the governor promised to help police.

“We’re still waiting on some of the resources that the governor promised us to help us fight crime,” Young said at a press conference on Wednesday. “Instead of the governor talking about the crime, give us the resources we asked for.”

Officials break ground on Lexington Market with vision balancing tradition, transformation

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Photo via Gov. Larry Hogan’s office.

The makeover of Lexington Market began on Tuesday as state and city officials broke ground on the project to reconstruct downtown Baltimore’s 238-year-old public market.

Updating the market will be part of building Baltimore “better and stronger for the future,” said Baltimore Mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young, who envisioned a day when tourists from across the country will flock to the city to visit the new Lexington Market.

“Lexington Market’s next chapter represents an incredible opportunity for our city, and it is essential that we support the equitable redevelopment and revitalization of this economic hub for delicious food and homegrown entrepreneurship as we continue to grow Baltimore,” he said.

Todd Carter named permanent Baltimore IT director after serving in interim role

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Photo via Wikimedia Commons

Baltimore City has a permanent information technology director after Mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young promoted the acting director, who has been serving in that position since October, according to a news release from the mayor’s office Thursday.

In a bit of a trial by fire, Todd A. Carter started working in the Baltimore City Office of Information & Technology (BCIT) on May 7, the same day a ransomware attack compromised Baltimore city government’s computer network.

The BCIT director at the time, Frank Johnson, went on leave in September and resigned from his post in October.

Community groups raise concerns over 79-space parking lot proposed for Druid Hill Park

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An aerial rendering of the planned renovations to the Druid Hill Aquatic Center. Image courtesy of Baltimore City Recreation and Parks.

A plan to update the swimming pool at Druid Hill Park is drawing community support, but some residents are questioning the need for a 79-space parking lot.

The Druid Hill Aquatic Center is slated to undergo renovations to its main pools and mechanical systems and add a new bathhouse and kiddie splash pool. But the project would also add dozens parking spaces around the tennis courts across East Drive from the aquatic center, leaving several community groups concerned about the safety of pedestrians and cyclists amidst increased vehicle traffic.

Mayor challenges transportation workers to fill 5,000 potholes in 50 days

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Mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young uses a shovel to spread asphalt over a pothole before packing it down. Image courtesy of Charm TV Baltimore.

There was one fewer pothole in Baltimore Wednesday morning after Mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young packed asphalt into one on N. Collington Avenue in East Baltimore, kicking off a challenge for transportation workers to fill 5,000 potholes over the next 50 days.

The 50-day pothole challenge is the latest piece of Young’s “Clean It Up!” campaign, which he launched last month, to beautify Baltimore.

After hearing plentiful testimony from residents, council considers Complete Streets bill

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Photo by Ethan McLeod

A Baltimore City Council committee heard hours of mostly supportive testimony on Wednesday night for a bill that would require the city to ultimately prioritize pedestrian, cycling and public transit over cars, aligning with Complete Streets guidelines.

Please Don’t Charge $1 For the Charm City Circulator

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Charm-City-Circulator-bus-01
When it first launched in 2010, the Charm City Circulator linked Penn Station, the Inner Harbor, Fort McHenry, and Harbor East through its free bus service. It was aimed at helping tourists explore the city, but plenty of regular folks–myself included–were happy to use the service as well. Which was totally fine — there was no limit or regulation to who could ride the free buses. Which some city councilmembers seem to see as a problem.

Why Baltimore Can’t Force Companies to Hire Local

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Bernard C. "Jack" Young
Bernard C. “Jack” Young

City Council President Bernard C. “Jack” Young floated a bill back in November that would require businesses to find local residents for at least a bare majority of jobs financed by big contracts with the city — which would be great if it weren’t unconstitutional.

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