Schools

Art Abounds at St. James Academy

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Artist-in-residence, Joanne Bare worked with SJA Middle School students, creating a mural inspired by David Hockney’s artwork.

At St. James Academy, art is everywhere— in the halls, hanging from ceilings, and certainly in the minds of the students. Colorful murals, whimsical sculptures and other impressive visual works created by artists-in-residence fill the building. The art teachers inspire a passion for art-making in their students who are usually found in the art room during recess, putting finishing touches on projects they began in class or engaging in arts-themed after-school clubs.

“My goal is to create art patrons, and for them to enjoy the process of art,” says Annie Bergland, middle school art teacher at St. James Academy. Within a supportive environment, students attain that goal in various ways. 

Mercy High School President Selected for Columbia University Fellowship Program

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Mary Beth Lennon, president of Mercy High School, is one of just 20 school leaders from around the world selected for this year’s Klingenstein Heads of Schools Program at Columbia University’s Teachers College. This fully funded fellowship brings together 20 school heads from independent schools in the United States together with international school leaders from Colombia, Thailand, Hong Kong, Tunisia, India, Japan, and Honduras to consider educational philosophy, leadership, and strategic innovation.

“This prestigious fellowship affirms the remarkable momentum that Mercy High School has experienced under Mary Beth Lennon’s leadership,” said Kevin Burke, chair of Mercy’s Board of Trustees. “The Board is delighted that Mary Beth will have the opportunity to join with other accomplished independent school leaders from around the world for intensive professional study, collaboration and reflection. The experience will prove invaluable as Mercy continues to be an innovative leader in girls education and a top choice for area families.”

Rising Women at NDP

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NDP’s entrepreneurs-in-training at Stanley Black & Decker

At Notre Dame Prep (NDP), the mission of “educating girls to transform the world” is lived every day, in and out of the classroom.  What better way to accomplish this than to send students out into the business world, giving them the opportunity to both work with and learn from women executives.  This was part of the inspiration behind NDP’s most recent on-campus club, Rising Women.  Co-sponsored by Junior Achievement, Rising Women partners NDP students with female mentors from Stanley Black and Decker.  With a Shark Tank-like format, the 17-week program challenges a selective group of high schoolers to develop, pitch and produce a product to a group of businesswomen mentors.

The expectations are high and JA Rising Women underlines the importance of commitment.  In its literature, it claims, “The program is great experience, but relies on the effort of the students involved to make it successful.”

Roland Park Country School Gifted $1.75 Million to Support STEAM/STEM Education

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Alumna gift will establish three separate endowments at the all-girls school

Roland Park Country School (RPCS) has received a $1,750,000 pledge from alumna Holliday “Holly” Cross Heine, 1962 and her husband John “Jack” C. Heine of Santa Barbara, California. The pledge will be split to create three separate endowments that will fund in perpetuity a new K-8 STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math) Director role, the existing STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Director role and the School’s signature STEM Institute.

“I am profoundly grateful to Holly and Jack for their generosity and enthusiastic support of our comprehensive STEM and STEAM curricula, which span every grade level and department,” said Caroline Blatti, Head of School. “I am also so honored that as an alumna who has built such a successful career in this field, Holly shares our purpose of intentionally harnessing our students’ boundless imaginations and curiosity to give them the confidence, knowledge and tools they need to build a solid foundation and deep understanding of these concepts.”

2020 Brings Exciting Changes for Baltimore Education Company: Now Offering Point-Based Guarantees for Virtual Tutoring

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When you think about test prep, you think of companies like Kaplan or Princeton Review, both of which offer class-based programs on an expedited timeline.  Maybe you know a few people who have had success with these kinds of programs.They’ve been around forever. These courses provide instructors with pre-written lesson plans, recycled questions and homework assignments, and virtually no individual attention.  And this option will work for some students— because it sounds a lot like school.

Commercialized, class-based options are more affordable. Their affordability is why customers keep coming even when the results aren’t consistent or proven.  Those with the money, who want to avoid the wasted time and middling results the class option often delivers, will seek out one-on-one tutoring.  But even then, it’s difficult for parents to find a reliable company or tutor. How does a parent know when they’ve found a test prep option worthy of a lofty investment?

Streamline Tutors, a Baltimore-based test prep company, is taking the guesswork out of the equation. Starting in February 2020, Streamline will be offering point-based improvement virtual tutoring packages.  This means that parents can make an investment in their students’ future with guaranteed results— in the size of 150 or 200 points of improvement— to the tune of $20 per SAT point.

Gilman School launches investigation into past sexual abuse

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More than 10 years after a teacher at Gilman School resigned following reports that he sexually abused students, the prestigious all-boys private school is launching a new investigation to see if there are any other victims of sexual abuse either in its current student body or among its alumni.

MD lawmakers expect education to dominate 2020 session

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The dome of Maryland’s State House rises above buildings in Annapolis, Maryland, on Nov. 5, 2019. (Capital News Service photo by Elliott Davis.)

By Elliott Davis
Capital News Service

ANNAPOLIS — Reforming Maryland’s public education system. Building new schools. Addressing gun safety. Funding the state’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities. These are some of the issues that Maryland state lawmakers expect to dominate the 2020 General Assembly session.

When legislators return to Annapolis in early January, much will be different.

There will be new committee assignments. With multiple lawmakers having resigned during the fall, there will be new faces at the State House.

UMBC men’s basketball bolsters roster with international talent

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UMBC junior forward Daniel Akin, a London native. Courtesy: UMBC Athletics.

Growing up in London, junior UMBC forward Daniel Akin wasn’t exposed to a ton of quality basketball.

A track and field and handball talent growing up, Akins saw his first high-level basketball game in person during the 2012 Summer Olympics, when he watched the Team USA take on Spain, but he didn’t pick the game up officially until he was 16, after a growth spurt pushed him to 6-foot-9.

“I was kind of forced to play after that,” Akin says.

Photos: Hopkins engineering students test their skills in glider design contest

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Photo by J.M. Giordano

On Wednesday, Johns Hopkins University engineering students gathered in Levering Hall to put their design and construction skills to the test.

Led by mechanical engineering professor Steven Marra, the annual contest challenges students to make a glider that is propelled by a falling weight. The goal is to shoot the glider from one end of the room to the other, while also flying over a suspended string.

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