Schools

Roland Park Country School Gifted $1.75 Million to Support STEAM/STEM Education

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Alumna gift will establish three separate endowments at the all-girls school

Roland Park Country School (RPCS) has received a $1,750,000 pledge from alumna Holliday “Holly” Cross Heine, 1962 and her husband John “Jack” C. Heine of Santa Barbara, California. The pledge will be split to create three separate endowments that will fund in perpetuity a new K-8 STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math) Director role, the existing STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Director role and the School’s signature STEM Institute.

“I am profoundly grateful to Holly and Jack for their generosity and enthusiastic support of our comprehensive STEM and STEAM curricula, which span every grade level and department,” said Caroline Blatti, Head of School. “I am also so honored that as an alumna who has built such a successful career in this field, Holly shares our purpose of intentionally harnessing our students’ boundless imaginations and curiosity to give them the confidence, knowledge and tools they need to build a solid foundation and deep understanding of these concepts.”

2020 Brings Exciting Changes for Baltimore Education Company: Now Offering Point-Based Guarantees for Virtual Tutoring

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When you think about test prep, you think of companies like Kaplan or Princeton Review, both of which offer class-based programs on an expedited timeline.  Maybe you know a few people who have had success with these kinds of programs.They’ve been around forever. These courses provide instructors with pre-written lesson plans, recycled questions and homework assignments, and virtually no individual attention.  And this option will work for some students— because it sounds a lot like school.

Commercialized, class-based options are more affordable. Their affordability is why customers keep coming even when the results aren’t consistent or proven.  Those with the money, who want to avoid the wasted time and middling results the class option often delivers, will seek out one-on-one tutoring.  But even then, it’s difficult for parents to find a reliable company or tutor. How does a parent know when they’ve found a test prep option worthy of a lofty investment?

Streamline Tutors, a Baltimore-based test prep company, is taking the guesswork out of the equation. Starting in February 2020, Streamline will be offering point-based improvement virtual tutoring packages.  This means that parents can make an investment in their students’ future with guaranteed results— in the size of 150 or 200 points of improvement— to the tune of $20 per SAT point.

Gilman School launches investigation into past sexual abuse

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More than 10 years after a teacher at Gilman School resigned following reports that he sexually abused students, the prestigious all-boys private school is launching a new investigation to see if there are any other victims of sexual abuse either in its current student body or among its alumni.

MD lawmakers expect education to dominate 2020 session

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The dome of Maryland’s State House rises above buildings in Annapolis, Maryland, on Nov. 5, 2019. (Capital News Service photo by Elliott Davis.)

By Elliott Davis
Capital News Service

ANNAPOLIS — Reforming Maryland’s public education system. Building new schools. Addressing gun safety. Funding the state’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities. These are some of the issues that Maryland state lawmakers expect to dominate the 2020 General Assembly session.

When legislators return to Annapolis in early January, much will be different.

There will be new committee assignments. With multiple lawmakers having resigned during the fall, there will be new faces at the State House.

UMBC men’s basketball bolsters roster with international talent

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UMBC junior forward Daniel Akin, a London native. Courtesy: UMBC Athletics.

Growing up in London, junior UMBC forward Daniel Akin wasn’t exposed to a ton of quality basketball.

A track and field and handball talent growing up, Akins saw his first high-level basketball game in person during the 2012 Summer Olympics, when he watched the Team USA take on Spain, but he didn’t pick the game up officially until he was 16, after a growth spurt pushed him to 6-foot-9.

“I was kind of forced to play after that,” Akin says.

Photos: Hopkins engineering students test their skills in glider design contest

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Photo by J.M. Giordano

On Wednesday, Johns Hopkins University engineering students gathered in Levering Hall to put their design and construction skills to the test.

Led by mechanical engineering professor Steven Marra, the annual contest challenges students to make a glider that is propelled by a falling weight. The goal is to shoot the glider from one end of the room to the other, while also flying over a suspended string.

St. James Academy: In Tune with Students’ Innate Need and Ability to Perform

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Ample research demonstrates the multiple benefits that regular exposure to music education provides for children of all ages: improved attention, memory, focus, auditory and memory skills, and overall cognition. Yet, too often, budget cuts squeeze music education funding, forcing schools to pare down or eliminate music classes altogether for school-aged children. St. James Academy in Monkton, however, is bucking this trend. In recent years, their music and performance arts offerings have increased in number and scope due to the quality of the St. James program, creating life-long music enthusiasts and confident performers.

Much of the credit for St. James’ strong performing arts program stems from a supportive administration and extensively trained faculty who not only teach but also perform professionally. Director of Performing Arts and vocal music teacher Randi Martin, who holds a master’s degree in music education from Loyola University, a certification in YogaVoice® Technique, and additional training in the Alexander Technique, Vocal-Cross Training, Orff, and Gordon Music Learning Theory, sees the performing arts as much more than a dispensable academic elective. At St. James, the extensive performing arts program includes courses in dance/movement, Orff for percussionists, wind and string instruction, plus three musicals.

The Rollout of R.E.D. Block at Roland Park Country School

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New RPCS Curriculum Offers Students Toolkit to Effect Change

How is leadership learned? At Roland Park Country School, our teachers and administrators strive to show our students what leadership looks like and the paths they can take to get there through integrity, courage and character. But we also recognize the worth of real world experiences.

To help empower students in grades 9-11 to find their voices, lead for the greater good and put their learnings into practice, Roland Park Country School recently rolled out a new program called R.E.D. (Reflect. Explore. Do.) Block. R.E.D. Block is the central strand of the RPCS Leadership and Entrepreneurship Institute, which equips our Upper School students with robust offerings designed to embolden them to create positive change in the world and help them consider, with their numerous strengths, what kind of difference they intend to make, and how they might begin to make their ideas into realities.

In R.E.D. Block, every student is involved in activities that require deep-thinking, exploration and creative problem solving to foster resilience, promote healthy risk-taking, nourish passions and curiosity, and promote purposefulness.

“We are always looking for intentional and meaningful ways to encourage our next generation of women leaders,” said Caroline Blatti, Head of School. “R.E.D. Block shows our students what is possible and how their actions can truly change the world.”

Roland Park Country School is Making Space for Wellness

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At Roland Park Country School, we want our students to live healthy and balanced lives; in fact, it’s one of our core values. This starts with an academic program that challenges and engages our girls, while allowing them to be children and teenagers. But wellness goes beyond the student workload and through intentional programming at every grade level, student-led initiatives, and resources for parents and guardians, we make sure that every student has a strong social-emotional support system to help them be healthy and well.

To support this effort, a new wellness suite was recently constructed on the RPCS campus, with offices for several members of the Student Services team, including the Director of Counseling, counselors at each division level,  and the counseling intern, as well as the Director of Leadership and Entrepreneurship. The inviting offices are spacious enough for the counselors to hold classes, but are also comfortable for private meetings with students. Student artwork decorates the suite and a mindfulness wall in the cheery hallway displays several take-one cards for students, offering tips on wellness topics including desk stretches and breathing techniques. Slips are also available in the wellness suite for students to confidentially request one-on-one meetings with a counselor. “This is a space that students can access at all times,” said Makeda King-Smith, Upper School Counselor. “It’s so important to help students with stress and anxiety as early as we can.”

Program Profiles: Learn about what’s offered at Baltimore independent schools

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Independent schools offer more than just reading, writing, and arithmetic. The below program profiles, from our annually published “Guide to Baltimore Independent Schools,” explore the classes, internships, experiential learning and more that enrich the curricula at area private schools. Applications are due in December at most schools. Check websites for exact dates.

Beth Tfiloh – College Counseling

Beth Tfiloh Dahan Community School is Baltimore’s only co-educational college preparatory Jewish day school spanning preschool through 12th grade. Faculty members address each individual learner’s needs throughout the rigorous dual curriculum while building creativity, leadership skills, and community ties.

Guides