Former Pratt Library in Federal Hill to Become An Events Space

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Courtesy Zillow
Courtesy Zillow

And now, Library & Company?

After restoring the upper level of the former Hampden Presbyterian Church on Falls Road as a venue for weddings and other events, Church & Company directors Alexander Fox and Joey Rubolotta are launching a new project in Federal Hill.

“I’m thrilled to announce Church & Company is expanding with a new second location, the 1886 former Enoch Pratt Branch Library No. 3,” Fox wrote on Facebook. “Opens November 15…Very excited to re-create an 1880s library.”

The brick and stone building at 1401 Light Street is one of four original structures of the Enoch Pratt Free Library System, all designed in a Richardsonian Romanesque style by the noted architect Charles Carson.

The library opened on Feb. 27, 1886, and closed on Sept. 1, 1971, when a new library opened at 1251 Light Street. It was sold by the city as surplus property and has been a private residence, a gallery and other uses. As an events space, it will be called The Library.

Fox, an Ohio native who moved to Baltimore to study at the Maryland Institute College of Art and never left, calls Church & Company a “design project” that is funded through space rentals. He is constantly modifying and embellishing the space.

The stone church at 3647 Falls Road was designed by George Frederick, the architect of Baltimore’s City Hall, and opened in 1875. Part of the Doors Open Baltimore tour in October, it has been used as a setting for weddings, plays, birthday celebrations, photo shoots, concerts, pop-up shopping parties, meetings and even religious services.

The library is actually the third restoration project that Fox and Rubolotta have taken on in Baltimore. They also restored a small cottage and garden near Falls Road and 37th  Street as an events venue called the Little House Garden, offering an outdoor counterpart to the renovated church across the street.

Ed Gunts

Ed Gunts

Ed Gunts is a local freelance writer and the former architecture critic for The Baltimore Sun.
Ed Gunts


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