Visitors purchase apple cider and other drinks at the Christmas Village in Baltimore’s Inner Harbor. Photo by Kory Aversa.

This year’s Christmas Village in the Inner Harbor will be the biggest ever for Baltimore, with over 50 local and international vendors selling toys, apparel, jewelry, decorations and more.

The indoor and outdoor German Christmas Market at West Shore Park will have a preview weekend Nov. 19-20, then officially kick off Thanksgiving and run through Christmas Eve.

“It’s the most wonderful time of year on the Baltimore Waterfront,” said Christmas Village Project Manager Nancy Schmalz in a statement. “Christmas Village is honestly so thrilled to be such a loved part of Charm City. So this year we are spreading the love by expanding and offering more vendor locations to enjoy for the very first time.”

Now entering its ninth season, the Christmas Village in Baltimore will be open Sundays to Thursdays from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Fridays to Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Thanksgiving Day from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Christmas Eve from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The village will be closed on Nov. 21, 22, 23, 28, and 29, and on Dec. 5, 6, 12, and 13.

Ornaments hang at a vendor’s booth at the Christmas Village in Baltimore. Photo by Kory Aversa.

The outdoor portion of the Christmas Village is free to visit. The indoor heated festival tent will be free to enter for the first two weekends. After that, tickets will be $5 for adults 18 and older, and free for children under 18 years old. Once attendees buy a ticket once, they can return anytime for the rest of the season without having to pay admission again.

“Christmas Village sees so many repeat visitors – they come for the shopping, the food, the mulled wine, and the decorations,” said Schmalz. “Tickets act as a season pass which makes it easy for visitors to come back.”

Leashed dogs are also welcome at the Christmas Village.

Returning this year will be the 30-foot-tall Christmas Pyramid from the Ore Mountains, the 65-foot-tall Ferris Wheel that will be lit up, and a carousel with toy horses and reindeer to ride around and around.

The Christmas Village in Baltimore will be back in the Inner Harbor starting Thanksgiving, which a preview weekend Nov. 19-20. Photo by Christina Kalff.

Vendors will sell their goods in new wooden vendor huts stretching along the Inner Harbor Promenade, as well as inside the heated festival tent.

Among the booths will be German vendor Käthe Wohlfahrt, who will be selling thousands of glass ornaments, nutcrackers, pyramids, and holiday decorations.

There will be ample food options at the festival, including grilled bratwurst, schnitzel, potato pancakes, Belgian fries, pretzels, cheese sandwiches, bacon on a stick, gingerbread, and more.

Visitors aged 21 and older can enjoy Glühwein, a mulled red wine; blueberry, white, and spiced apple wines; spiked drinks like Irish Coffee with whipped cream and Hot Toddies; Hofbräu beers on draft; and more.

Santa Claus and Gingy the Gingerbread Man take a photo together under the Ferris wheel at the Christmas Village in Baltimore. Photo by Christina Kalff.

And for children or for adults who prefer non-alcoholic beverages, try the Kinder Punsch, a non-alcoholic, German-style, spiced, hot, fruit punch-like drink.

Attendees can also take photos with Santa Claus, say hello to Gingy the Gingerbread Man, and enjoy live entertainment.

Christkind, a traditional German gift-bringer, will return Nov. 26 for the first time since before the pandemic.

Christmas Village is also partnering with local organizations to create the Holiday District in the Inner Harbor, with a village Christmas tree at the Inner Harbor ice rink.

“Christmas Village is a holiday tradition from my home country – where it is common to visit the market over and over again during the holidays,” Schmalz said. “This tradition is one that I want to share with as many families as possible. This is our little gift to all the families and our biggest fans – plus new visitors that want more!”

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Marcus Dieterle

Marcus Dieterle is the managing editor of Baltimore Fishbowl. He returned to Baltimore in 2020 after working as the deputy editor of the Cecil Whig newspaper in Elkton, Md. He can be reached at marcus@baltimorefishbowl.com...

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