Johns Hopkins APL Has New Pictures of Pluto

0
Share the News


Mission-PathtoPluto-MissionTimeline-TenYears_sm

Poor Pluto. Once considered the solar system’s ninth planet, it recently got demoted to “large object” status.

Luckily, even though isn’t technically a planet anymore, Pluto still gets plenty of love from astronomers. Case in point: NASA’s New Horizons probe, which is administered by the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab, is currently nearing the end of its 10-year, 3 billion mile journey to take the closest-ever look at Pluto.

This week, in honor of the birth of Pluto discoverer Clyde Tombaugh, NASA released the New Horizons’ newest images of Pluto, which are from a mere 126 million miles away.

Image via NASA/ JHU APL/Southwest Research Institute
Image via NASA/ JHU APL/Southwest Research Institute

Okay, sure, it doesn’t look like much. But consider this: 3 BILLION MILES. That’s crazy.

Stay tuned for even more exciting pictures of a vague, fuzzy blob this summer, when the New Horizons gets even closer to Pluto.



Share the News