National Geographic Traveler Spends 48 Hours in Baltimore — And Of Course, They Mention Beehive Hairdos

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For the June/July issue of National Geographic Traveler, journalist Katie Knorovsky spent 48 hours in Baltimore. She found waterfront luxury condos, weird art, and of course the obligatory hons (just once, I’d like to see a Baltimore travel piece that doesn’t mention beehive hairdos. Is that too much to ask?). In Baltimore, Knorovsky writes, “Centuries of history loom large and a newly buoyant tax base adds gloss, while a mosaic of colorful neighborhoods, vibrant art and music scenes, and a deep-rooted sports culture still shines through.” True — but also, well, YAWN.

Which is to say, the Baltimore weekend that NatGeo proposes seems perfectly serviceable: On day one, spend a morning perusing high culture in the museums of Charles Village and Mt. Vernon, an afternoon enjoying the “kitsch klatch” of Hampden, and an evening taking in whatever the Creative Alliance has to offer; On day two, explore Little Italy, the Inner Harbor, and Harbor East.

But it got me thinking:  if you wanted to give someone a less predictable, less tourist-oriented tour of the city, where would you take them? Here are a few ideas I came up with; if you’ve got suggestions, please let us know in the comments!

+Great Blacks in Wax Museum  – To honor Baltimore’s (and the nation’s) African-American history — and because wax figures are totally uncanny; it’s hard to look away.

+Green Mount Cemetery – To pay your respects to Napoleon’s sister-in-law and Johns Hopkins — and to seek out the secret, unmarked grave of John Wilkes Booth.

+Edgar Allen Poe House (once it opens back up in October!) – To support a struggling local site — and to see just how small the rooms are. (No wonder Poe’s stories captured claustrophobia so well!).

+Crabtowne USA – To play 1980s arcade games to your heart’s content.

+Blob’s Park – To learn to polka — and dance to a live band!

+Seoul Spa – To get pampered, Korean-style — and to get a glimpse of Baltimore’s vibrant Korean population.



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