Ruling: Porter Must Testify Against Fellow Officers in Freddie Gray Case

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Officer Caesar R. Goodson Jr., Officer Edward M. Nero, Officer Garrett E Miller (top L-R), Officer William G. Porter, Lt. Brian W. Rice, Sgt. Alicia D. White (bottom L-R),
Officer Caesar R. Goodson Jr., Officer Edward M. Nero, Officer Garrett E Miller (top L-R), Officer William G. Porter, Lt. Brian W. Rice, Sgt. Alicia D. White (bottom L-R),

Maryland’s highest court opened up the potential that the trials of Baltimore police in the Freddie Gray case could continue. 

In a pair of rulings, the Maryland Court of Appeals ruled that Officer William Porter will have to testify in the trials of five other officers accused in the 25-year-old West Baltimore resident’s 2015 death in police custody. The state wants to call Porter as a witness in their case as part of their legal strategy, so the ruling was a win for the prosecution. Porter, who was already questioned about interactions with other officers on the stand in his own trial, didn’t want to testify ahead of his own June retrial following a hung jury.

With Tuesday’s ruling, the Court of Appeals sent the case back to the lower court, which would potentially set up the next trial to move forward in Baltimore. The timing for the resumption of the trials wasn’t immediately clear, nor was the order of the officers would be tried. Officer Caesar Goodson, who drove the van that carried Gray through West Baltimore, was initially slated to be tried after Porter.

Porter’s attorneys would have to appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court if they still want to argue that their client should not have to testify.



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1 COMMENT

  1. Seems wrong, how is he to testify against others and NOT incriminate himself? What a joke! And who cares? The mayor already paid the Grey family $6.4M. Even if Freddie was the best drug dealer ever, $6.4M for the lost income seems excessive.

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