Tag: authors

Tonight at The Ivy Bookshop- Steven Galloway: The Confabulist

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Steven Galloway: The Confabulist

Thursday, May 8, 2014 – 7:00pm

THE IVY BOOKSHOP

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The Confabulist weaves the rise and fall of world-famous Harry Houdini with the surprising story of Martin Strauss, an unknown man whose fate seems forever tied to the magician’s in a way that will startle and amaze. It is at once a vivid portrait of an alluring, turn-of-the-century world; a front-row seat to a world-class magic show; and an unexpected love story. In the end, the book is a kind of magic trick in itself: there is much more to Martin than meets the eye.

Steven Galloway lives in British Columbia and teaches creative writing at the University of British Columbia. He is the author ofThe Cellist of Sarajevo, which was an IndieBound and a Barnes and Noble Discover selection, and has been chosen for community reads across the country.

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The Ivy Bookshop
6080 Falls Road

Baltimore, MD 21209

 

 

Upcoming Events Feb/March at The Ivy

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IVY

February / March
UPCOMING EVENTS
2014

Thursday, February 20, 7 PM.
Patty Dann:
 Starfish 

Patty Dann’s long-awaited sequel to Mermaids, the novel that became the cult-classic movie, catches up with the Flax family 27 years later. Charlotte Flax, now the 41-year-old single mother of a grown son, picks up the threads of her old life while planning a 60th birthday party for the still peripatetic Mrs. Flax, made famous by Cher.

Thursday, February 27, 7 PM.
Carol Berkin:
 Wondrous Beauty: The Life and Adventures of Elizabeth Patterson Bonaparte 

Carol Berkin, award-winning historian and author ofRevolutionary Mothers, examines the remarkable life of Elizabeth Patterson Bonaparte, the Baltimore woman who caused a scandal when she married Napoleon’s younger brother. Forsaken by her husband, Bonaparte returned to Baltimore a cynical, independent woman and a shrewd investor.

Saturday, March 8, 1-4 PM.
INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH LITERARY FESTIVAL
(*At the Pratt Central Library)

Author readings followed by a reception with the audience.Moderated by Linda A. Duggins of Hachette Book Group, and featuring authors Misty Copeland, Lauren Francis-Sharma, Deborah Johnson and Sujata Massey.

Justin Kramon at The Ivy Bookshop on Oct. 22

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Originally published on October 17, 2013 – Join The Ivy Bookshop October 22 at 7 p.m. as it welcomes Justin Kramon to read from his suspenseful new novel of love and obsession, The Preservationist. (Read the Baltimore Fishbowl interview with Kramon here.)

About the Book

To Sam Blount, meeting Julia is the best thing that has ever happened to him. Working at the local college and unsuccessful in his previous relationships, he’d been feeling troubled about his approaching fortieth birthday, “a great beast of a birthday,” as he sees it, but being with Julia makes him feel young and hopeful. Julia Stilwell, a freshman trying to come to terms with a recent tragedy that has stripped her of her greatest talent, is flattered by Sam’s attention. But their relationship is tested by a shy young man with a secret, Marcus Broley, who is also infatuated with Julia.

Told in alternating points of view, The Preservationist is the riveting tale of Julia’s and Sam’s relationship, which begins to unravel as the threat of violence approaches and Julia becomes less and less sure whom she can trust.

“Hunt for Red October” Author Tom Clancy, Dead at 66

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The Baltimore Sun is reporting that Baltimorean and Loyola Blakefield alum Tom Clancy, who wrote several bestselling thrillers that became huge movie blockbusters and inspired video games, died yesterday at Johns Hopkins Hospital after a brief illness.  He was 66.

 

Manil Suri Reads from His Latest Novel at The Ivy

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Manil Suri comes to The Ivy Bookshop Thursday, February 7 at 7 p.m. to read from the last novel in his acclaimed trilogy that began with The Death of Vishnu and The Age of Shiva.

Marion Winik to Contribute Brainy/Confessional Fishbowl Column

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In her new “Bohemian Rhapsody” column for Baltimore Fishbowl, set to launch tomorrow morning, Marion Winik continues the low-boundaries yet eerily relatable approach to storytelling that made her a popular commentator on “All Things Considered” for 15 years. Today a once-widowed, once-divorced, fifty-something single mother, Winik has been writing about growing up, parenting, relationships and various social and cultural matters since the early 80s. Her hope in her Baltimore Fishbowl column is to continue to make people feel better about themselves by revealing her stupid decisions, pushover attitude and amazing powers of rationalization. To be a boon to the self-esteem of her peers: This is why she writes.

Asbury Park, New Jersey native Winik started out as a poet (nonstop, 1981, BoyCrazy, 1986, both out-of-print but online at marionwinik.com.)  In 1987, she began writing essays for a Texas alternative weekly, The Austin Chronicle, and through a series of lucky breaks, ended up on NPR. As a result, magazines like Redbook, Harpers Bazaar, Cosmo, and Men’s Journal began to publish her work and her first collection of essays, Telling, came out from Random House in 1994.

When her first husband Tony — a gay bartender/ice skater she met at Mardi Gras — died of AIDS in 1994, she was left with two young sons. Her memoir First Comes Love (1996) tells the story of their marriage and wrestles with issues like sexual preference, IV drug abuse, terminal illness, assisted suicide and whether there’s really anything good about Disney World. It was a New York Times Notable Book and has been in development as a feature film for many years now. All kinds of fancy people have been involved (Henry Winkler, Ally Sheedy, Kathy Bates, even Pink), but nothing much has ever happened.

Her next book, The Lunch-Box Chronicles: Notes from the Parenting Underground (1998) revealed the surprising bearability of her life as the widowed single mom of two little boys. It was selected by Child Magazine as a parenting book of the year and was made into a pilot for a TV series by CBS/Universal. Monica Potter played Winik, and parts were invented for Steve Carrell, Andy Richter, and a sheepdog. As you might expect, the sheepdog was the kiss of death and the pilot was filmed but never aired.

In 1999, she left Austin for a second marriage in Pennsylvania. By this time she was teaching writing — today she is a prof in the MFA program at the University of Baltimore — and working for O, More, Ladies’ Home Journal, Real Simple and The New York Times Magazine. After a talk at her old high school in New Jersey, she wrote an advice book called Rules for the Unruly: Living an Unconventional Life (2001), since adapted into a greeting card and refrigerator magnet — the real moneymakers, as she will readily tell you. The magnet was followed by Above Us Only Sky in 2005 and The Glen Rock Book of the Dead in 2007.

But what impresses people most of all, usually, is that Marion Winik was on “Oprah.” Yeah, well, it wasn’t awesome as you think. Story for another time. These days she is working on a new book, Love in the Time of Baltimore, from which chapters (“The Boomer and the Boomerang,” “Desperate Housewives of Roland Park“) will be featured from time to time in “Bohemian Rhapsody.”

To learn more about Marion Winik, go to marionwinik.com.

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