Tag: doreen bolger

BMA Director Doreen Bolger to Retire

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Photo by Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post
Photo by Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post

After 17 years, Doreen Bolger will retire as Director of the Baltimore Museum of Art, according to an announcement issued Wednesday.

New York Times Gets Excited About Baltimore Museum of Art

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Photo via Baker Artist Awards
Photo via Baker Artist Awards

The grand, marble-stepped entrance to the Baltimore Museum of Art has been closed to visitors for as long as I’ve been alive. But starting next month, visitors will be able to walk up that grand staircase, pass between those massive columns, and enter into the museum in the grand old fashion.

Big Fish: A Conversation With Doreen Bolger As the BMA’s Centennial Nears

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Photo by Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post
BMA Director Doreen Bolger. Photo by Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post

Since taking over as Director of the Baltimore Museum of Art 16 years ago, Doreen Bolger has presided over an era of carefully thought-out change. There was the renovation of the Cone Wing in 2001, the initiation of several scholarly traveling exhibitions, and the elimination of general admissions fees in 2006 —as well as everyday crises like this year’s return of the stolen Renoir.

Women Are Taking Over Baltimore’s Art Institutions

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This week, the Walters Art Museum welcomed its new director, Julia Marciari-Alexander. Marciari-Alexander replaces Gary Vikan, a 27-year veteran of the institution, and joins Doreen Bolger (director of the Baltimore Museum of Art) and Rebecca Hoffberger (director of the American Visionary Art Museum) to make a trifecta of badass women in charge of the city’s largest art institutions.

Flea Market Renoir Reignites Family’s Feud with BMA

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The story of the flea market Renoir — the small painting by the Impressionist master that was bought at a West Virginia flea market for $7 — at first seemed so happy, like something out of a romantic comedy. But of course, things are much more complicated than that… and it seems that the discovery that the painting was stolen from the Baltimore Museum of Art has re-opened all sorts of old wounds, including tales of filched Rembrandts and a Goucher College dean’s thefts from the BMA. It’s also reignited the feud between heiress/art collector/BMA benefactor Saidie May and her major benefactee, the Baltimore Museum of Art.

Flea Market Renoir Was Stolen from Baltimore Museum of Art — And the BMA Wants it Back

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When a story is too good to be true, alas, it often is. Earlier this month, we told you about the Baltimore native who bought a painting at a West Virginia flea market that turned out to be an authentic Renoir. The painting, “On the Shore of the Seine,” was authentic all right — and also authentically stolen from the Baltimore Museum of Art back in 1951.

Women! Art! Revolution! Gala!

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This Friday, November 11, you’ve got two chances to celebrate Baltimore’s wealth of artsy women and women artists:

A gala! Starting at 6:30 p.m. Maryland Art Place, our favorite non-profit promoter of contemporary art around these parts, hosts a swanky evening in honor of its thirtieth birthday, and in celebration of female artists who’ve made their stamp on Baltimore’s cultural landscape. The honorees are something of a who’s-who of the city’s creative and inspiring women:  Marin Alsop, Doreen Bolger, Rheda Becker, Lynn Deering, Ethel Ennis, Nancy Grasmick, Leslie King-Hammond, Pat Joseph, Mary Ann Mears, Joyce J. Scott, Suzi Cordish and Leslie Shepard. And because no good gala is without a silent auction component, attendees will also be able to bid on works by regional artists.  (Check out the art up for auction at MAP’s website.) The cost:  $250 for the gala; $30 in advance/$40 at the door for the after party. It is a benefit, after all.

The event will also feature an exhibition of five MAP owned Grace Hartigans, pictured at right.

A film screening/panel! At 7 p.m., Towson University hosts a screening of the widely-acclaimed documentary Women Art Revolution!, followed by a panel featuring even more creative and inspiring female artists (Jenny Graf Sheppard, Laure Drogoul, Stephanie Barber, and Zoe Charlton) talking about feminism, art, and politics. The film itself has been described as a “secret history” of feminist art. This one is free.

If you figure out a way that we can attend both, let us know!

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