Tag: marriage equality

Baltimore Raven Uses Super Bowl Fame to Advocate for Gay Rights

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Just hours after the Ravens won the AFC Championship game, Brendon Ayanbadejo was already thinking strategically — not so much about football (though we hope that’s on his mind, too), but about how he could use this trip to the Super Bowl to further his favorite adopted cause, gay rights.

For Ayanbadejo, Being Called “Gay” Is an Honor

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Time was, celebrities rumored to be gay would issue a statement vehemently denying any queer tendencies and then quickly add, “not that there would be anything wrong with that!” Well, we may be fast approaching a time when those same celebrities may responding with something more like, “No, but I’m so flattered you’d assume that,” what with GQ naming Raven Brendon Ayanbadejo (as well as Viking Chris Kluwe) an “honorary gay” for his vocal, uncompromising support of gay marriage this past year.

You’re Invited to a “Big Gay Public Wedding”

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Put it on your calendars now:  if you voted yes on Question 6, thus helping Maryland be one of the first states to legalize marriage equality by popular vote, then you’re invited to Chris and Shawn Riley’s “big gay public Maryland wedding” the second weekend of April 2013. A week before the election, Chris Riley told the internet that if Question 6 passed, he would “invite ANYONE that votes YES to my wedding ceremony.” He’s making good on that promise — so we have a feeling it’ll be a pretty crazy party.

Baltimore’s Faith Leaders Weigh in on Marriage Equality

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As you’ve probably heard, Baltimore’s new archbishop, William Lori, sent a letter urging “Catholics and faithful citizens” to “show up on election day and do our part by voting against Question 6,” the bill that would establish marriage equality in Maryland. But some of Baltimore’s Catholic leaders are speaking their mind in quite a different way.

The Governor and the Football Player Walk Into a Bar to Support Gay Marriage

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No it’s not a set-up for a joke — it’s more like a team we wouldn’t mind joining:  last night, Ravens linebacker Brendon Ayanbadejo and Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley joined forces in support of marriage equality (and foosball) in a fundraiser at Federal Hill bar Mother’s last night.

Marylanders Increasingly Support Same-Sex Marriage

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Support for marriage equality has increased among Maryland voters, according to a recent poll conducted by Gonzales Research & Marketing. Fifty-one percent now say they would vote “yes” on Question 6, affirming the Civil Marriage Protection Act passed by Maryland lawmakers earlier this year.

You Thought Gay Marriage Was Legally Complicated? Try Gay Divorce

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Well, the conservatives were right, it is a slippery slope. First gay couples wanted the right to marry, and look, now they think they should be able to get divorced, too! Geez, what’s next?

In 2008, two women living in DC, Jessica Port and Virginia Anne Cowan, flew to San Francisco to marry. A year and a half ago they filed for divorce in Maryland; their request was denied by a Prince George’s County judge. Other same-sex spouses have attempted divorces in Maryland, to mixed results. Some of them get approved, while others get denied, with little rhyme or reason.

It must feel strange to reside in Maryland in a same-sex marriage; the union is recognized by Maryland’s state agencies, but not Maryland as a whole, and is not recognized federally. If you can’t get a divorce it’s even stranger, as you remain legally half-tethered to your would-be ex.

Perhaps the whole thing is a little more complicated than it needs to be. According to an article in The Sun, Maryland currently recognizes even incestuous marriages from another state, though it’s considered criminal here. And yet, when it comes to gay marriages — which could become the law of the land in Maryland in January — it seems our judges can’t help but get lost in the legal fog.

Port and Cowan’s divorce is headed to the Maryland Court of Appeals for a definitive decision that is likely to set the standard for all Maryland judges.

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