Tag: neuroscience

JHU Neuroscientist David Linden to Speak at Barnes and Noble Tuesday, Feb. 16

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David LindenRenowned Johns Hopkins neuroscientist and best-selling author David Linden will appear at the Charles Street Barnes and Noble (4701 N. Charles Street, near Hopkins Homewood Campus) on Tuesday, February 16 at 7 p.m. for a book signing and reading to promote the paperback release of TOUCH, his latest book on the brain.  In honor of the occasion, we re-post our 2015 Big Fish interview, Popular Scientist: Johns Hopkins Neuroscientist David Linden Explains the Brain Science Behind Hand, Heart, and Mind, by Bohemian Rhapsody Columnist Marion Winik. -The Eds.

Neuroscientist David Linden divides his time between a lab full of mice and post-doctoral students at the Johns Hopkins medical campus and a writing desk in his secret hideaway of a house, located on a wooded lane in a secluded part of North Baltimore. From there, he has produced three hugely successful books about the brain: “The Accidental Mind,” “The Compass of Pleasure: How Our Brains Make Fatty Foods, Orgasm, Exercise, Marijuana, Generosity, Vodka, Learning, and Gambling Feel So Good” and, “Touch: The Science of Hand, Heart and Mind.”

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Featured on Fresh Air, in the Wall Street Journal, in Playboy and elsewhere, Touch explores our capacity for sensation in areas ranging from sex to pain to chili peppers, and features Linden’s signature combination of personal storytelling, humor and amazing things you didn’t know about the brain, lucidly explained and illustrated. With his works translated into seventeen languages, this Baltimorean puts the popular in popular science. He found time between speaking engagements and rodent brain experiments to answer a few questions for the Baltimore Fishbowl.

Hopkins Study Explains Why It’s Hard to Break Bad Habits

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Candy

If you’ve already broken your New Year’s resolution to quit smoking/sugar/TV, don’t worry — it’s not your fault! It’s your brain’s fault!

Exercise Keeps Brains Young, Hopkins Researchers Say

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Vladimir Putin attempts to attain eternal youth through exercise
Vladimir Putin attempts to attain eternal youth through exercise

Neuroscientists have long understood that age and stress damage the brain, in part by depleting energy reserves that are crucial to brain cell function. At its most extreme, such damage shows up as diseases like Alzheimer’s. But new research out of Johns Hopkins indicates that exercise may play a powerful role in protecting the brain against age- and stress-related damage.

Hopkins Researchers Find Decision-Making Neurons

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The human brain is a magnificent thing. It enables us to walk, talk, and develop complex longterm plans–as well as make split-second decisions. A group of researchers at Johns Hopkins has been studying those split-second decisions, trying to pinpoint just where in the brain they take place. And according to a new paper, they’ve managed to figure out exactly which neurons are involved when a person slams on the brakes to avoid an accident.

Johns Hopkins Researchers’ Lab Mistake Leads to Nobel-Winning Discovery

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Dr. Torsten Wiesel, via the Golden Goose Award
Dr. Torsten Wiesel, via the Golden Goose Award

When is a mistake not a mistake? When it ends up winning you a Nobel Prize, of course.

Our Brains See Colors, But Don’t Remember Them

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Remember those stoned dorm room conversations about what it meant to really see a color? New research from cognitive psychologists at Johns Hopkins has provided some more food for thought when it comes to brains, colors, memory, and perception.

How Hopkins Is Using Mouse Whiskers to Study Autism

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Medical research regularly uses mice to test out hypotheses. And usually, those mice are dead. But some really exciting research out of Johns Hopkins has found a new way to study the neuroscience of mice–by peeking into their brains while they’re still alive. Yep, you heard that right–researchers were able to observe the mice brains with such precision that they could see how proteins changed when the mice formed new memories. In real time. That’s nuts.

Popular Scientist: Johns Hopkins Neuroscientist David Linden Explains the Brain Science Behind Hand, Heart, and Mind

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David Linden

Neuroscientist David Linden divides his time between a lab full of mice and post-doctoral students at the Johns Hopkins medical campus and a writing desk in his secret hideaway of a house, located on a wooded lane in a secluded part of North Baltimore. From there, he has produced three hugely successful books about the brain: “The Accidental Mind,” “The Compass of Pleasure: How Our Brains Make Fatty Foods, Orgasm, Exercise, Marijuana, Generosity, Vodka, Learning, and Gambling Feel So Good” and new this month, “Touch: The Science of Hand, Heart and Mind.”

Further Proof That Football Causes Brain Damage

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Image via ESPN.com
Image via ESPN.com

At this point, what insane holdouts still refuse to believe that football– a game in which gigantic men repeatedly slam into each other as hard as they can–causes brain damage? If you know any such people, point them towards this new research out of Johns Hopkins, which provides evidence (again) that repeated head injuries in football players poses a serious neurological risk.

That New Scarlett Johansson Movie Doesn’t Make Any Sense, Hopkins Doc Says

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So in the new Scarlett Johansson movie Lucy (directed by Luc Besson), Johansson’s character ingests a drug that effectively turns her into a superhero. (This isn’t really a spoiler since it happens in the film’s first 15 minutes. Also, it’s on the movie poster above.) As Morgan Freeman, cast in the role of Explaining Scientist, explains, that’s because while most people only use 10 percent of their brains, Lucy is now running at a much higher capacity. A cool idea… but one that doesn’t make any sense at all, according to Johns Hopkins neurologist Barry Gordon.

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