Tag: pedestrian safety

Guess Which Are Baltimore’s Most-Walkable Neighborhoods

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Photo by Graham Coriel-Allen via Flickr
Photo by Graham Coriel-Allen via Flickr

Did you walk to work/school/the store today? If so, then you were part of the proof that Baltimore’s a decently walkable city… in certain parts of town, at least.

Improvements in Store for Windy Road Behind Johns Hopkins

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When I saw that Johns Hopkins was planning to spend $15 million to improve San Martin Drive, my first reaction was Where the heck is San Martin Drive? And then I figured it out–it’s that windy road that connects Wyman Park Drive to University Parkway.

It’s Dangerous to Be a Pedestrian in Baltimore–But It’s Worse in Florida!

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via Graham Coreil-Allen on Flickr
via Graham Coreil-Allen on Flickr

Nearly 500 pedestrians were killed by Baltimore motorists between 2002 and 2013. That’s way too many people (and one reason we appreciate efforts like the Johns Hopkins pedestrian safety initiative). But believe it or not, we’re actually a much safer city than many other places… like Florida. Oh, Florida.

Six Thousand Shoes: Road Scholar Campaign Reminds Text-Happy Hopkins Students to Cross with Care

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Have you spotted the wall of yellow shoes hanging at St. Paul Street at 33rd? It’s quite stunning, actually. And hopefully a helpful reminder to student pedestrians not to text-step their way into oncoming traffic. JHU reports that at least two pedestrian accidents occurred monthly last year. The abundant display of shoes — ultimately, 3,000 pairs will perch in place, all gathered and spray-painted canary yellow by officials and volunteers — are part of a continuing JHU pedestrian safety campaign, in large part geared to stop “pedtextrians” from dreamily working their devices while they navigate an intersection. I wondered, why are certain random shoes painted bright white in the “Road Scholar” program’s wall-climbing array? Answer: They stand as a stark symbol of those pedestrians who were killed. Read more in Jill Rosen’s report in The Sun.

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