Tag: voters

Baltimore Fishbowl’s 2018 Primary Election live blog

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Welcome to Baltimore Fishbowl’s live blog of the primary elections! The day where Marylanders choose their political party’s candidate ahead of the November general election was not without its head-scratching drama, as machines didn’t work and polling places got shuffled around. Oh, and an estimated 80,000 people were affected by a Motor Vehicle Administration (MVA) computer glitch that failed to register changes in people’s address or party affiliation; those impacted by the snafu were told to cast provisional ballots.

Polls across the state are closing at 8 p.m., but here in Baltimore, some locations are staying open until 9 p.m. as a result of some of the aforementioned confusion.

We’re going to keep you updated on the latest results and, hopefully, provide some context and analysis as the returns roll in.

Marylanders strongly back term limits for General Assembly members, poll finds

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The inside of the General Assembly chambers in Annapolis. Photo by Roxanne Ready, via Flickr, used with a Creative Commons license.

Three of every four Marylanders support capping the time that state delegates and senators can serve in Annapolis, according to the newest Goucher Poll.

Black and White Marylanders Disagree on What Racial Inequality Looks Like, New Poll Shows

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Photo by Elvert Barnes, via Wikimedia Commons

Most Maryland voters, black or white, agree that race relations are in decline, according to the newest Goucher Poll for fall 2017. But when it comes to the details of how that manifests, there’s an apparent divide along racial lines.

Maryland State Senator Proposes Automatic Voter Registration

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Vote Button

Maryland Sen. Roger Manno wants to eliminate voter registration, and instead automatically enroll every Marylander of voting age with a state-issued ID card or who receives benefits from social services.

State to Spend $1.2 M to Move to Paper Voting System

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State election officials are planning to spend up to $1.2 million to hire just five contractors working for nine months, a high-dollar figure that has shocked key lawmakers and voter advocacy groups watching as the state transitions from touch-screen voting to paper ballots.

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