Capital News Service

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Legislature passes bill to expand post-conviction relief

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Photo by Julie Depenbrock/Capital News Service

By Alex Mann
Capital News Service

ANNAPOLIS — Many bills remained in the balance as the minute hand ticked toward midnight on April 9, the last of Maryland’s 90-day legislative session.

Among them was legislation addressing the rights of criminals to petition for post-conviction relief–a process of challenging a conviction in court.

As ‘House of Cards’ nears end, Maryland aims to remain film contender

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Still via Netflix/YouTube

ANNAPOLIS— Eduardo Sanchez is sleeping in his own bed for once.

He’s taking a short break from work, but the majority of his time over the course of the next few months will be spent in Dallas, where the filmmaker best known for “The Blair Witch Project” is able to work on film and TV productions with what he says are better state tax incentives than in his Maryland.

Election-year session ends with an eye on November

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Image via Capital News Service

ANNAPOLIS, Maryland — Overhauling state tax code in response to sweeping federal tax cuts, bolstering school safety after a shooting at a Southern Maryland high school and stabilizing health insurance markets in the wake of Congressional action were just a few of the myriad policy decisions the Maryland General Assembly addressed in 2018 during the 90-day legislative session.

Hogan vetoes cut to board’s school-construction oversight

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Gov. Larry Hogan holds up the vetoed legislation during the Board of Public Works meeting. Image via Facebook.

By Katherine Brzozowski
Capital News Service

ANNAPOLIS — Republican Gov. Larry Hogan on Wednesday vetoed a bill that would strip the state’s Board of Public Works of its power to oversee school construction funding, and was particularly aimed to take power away from Comptroller Peter Franchot, a Democrat.

HBCU settlement pending; Md. lawmakers say it’s not enough

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Morgan State University’s Earl S. Richardson Library. Photo via Wikimedia Commons.

By Layne Litsinger

ANNAPOLIS, Maryland — Historically black colleges and universities in Maryland would receive up to $56.9 million annually under legislation, sponsors say, that would restore years of underfunding and program duplication by the state but is unlikely to pass.

In-state tuition bill aimed at ‘Dreamers’ advances in Md.

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Photo by Kevin Galens, via Flickr

By Hannah Brockway
Capital News Service

ANNAPOLIS, Maryland — A bill that aims to ensure young, undocumented Maryland students referred to as “Dreamers,” can pursue higher education by giving qualified individuals access to in-state tuition is advancing in the Maryland General Assembly.

Hogan’s nonpublic schools funding gets ‘BOOST’ from students

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Gov. Larry Hogan high-fives students at a nonpublic school advocacy rally in Annapolis on Tuesday, March 13, 2018. Opponents of Gov. Hogan’s nonpublic school funding argue that public funds should be used for public schools. (Aaron Rosa/Capital News Service)

By Sean Whooley

ANNAPOLIS, Maryland —Hundreds of private school students, faculty, parents and supporters piled onto Lawyers Mall in Annapolis on Tuesday for a rally to support Gov. Larry Hogan’s funding for nonpublic schools.

In Congress, only one Maryland lawmaker gets NRA money

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Andy Harris. Image via Facebook.

By Jarod Golub and Julia Karron

WASHINGTON — As congressional gun talks ramp up, advocates for stronger safety laws have called for their representatives to stop accepting campaign finance donations from the National Rifle Association.

Bill expanding medical cannabis licenses advances

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Medical marijuana growing in Colorado

By Sean Whooley
Capital News Service

ANNAPOLIS, Maryland — A bill that would expand Maryland’s medical cannabis industry to include more minority ownership, after more than a month in legislative limbo, is moving again in the General Assembly, with amendments.

Critics hit Trump’s food program plan as ‘devastating’ to Maryland

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A grocery store in Mount Rainier, Md. Photo by Lance Cheung, via Wikimedia Commons.

By Julia Lerner

WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump’s budget proposal for fiscal 2019 includes an overhaul of a supplemental food assistance program for low-income people that could affect nearly 750,000 Marylanders.