Health and Fitness

Fewer people are being diagnosed with cancer due to COVID-19 pandemic, Maryland study finds

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Baltimore VA Medical Center. Photo by Veterans Health/Flickr.

New cancer diagnoses have decreased as a result of COVID-19 restrictions in hospitals and healthcare facilities, according to a new study.

Johns Hopkins Medicine receives first federal grant for psychedelic research in over half a century

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Photo by Nuno Macela/Flickr

This week, Johns Hopkins Medicine was awarded a grant from the National Institutes of Health to research the potential impacts of psilocybin on tobacco addiction. 

It is the first NIH grant awarded for the direct investigation of a classic psychedelic in over 50 years. 

Baltimore County releases new dashboard tracking opioid overdose data

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Baltimore County Opioid Overdose Data Dashboard

Baltimore County today announced the release of a new data dashboard that displays information about opioid incidents in the county.

Johns Hopkins releases new data maps on COVID-19 in Native communities

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Map of Tribal Land COVID-19 Data from Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center

Yesterday, the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center launched new maps and data tracking the impact of COVID-19 in American Indian and Alaska Native communities. 

Electronic cigarettes contain thousands of unknown chemicals, Johns Hopkins researchers find

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Photo by Revival Vape/Flickr

Yet another study has found that electronic cigarettes are a health risk. 

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University detected thousands of chemicals in electronic cigarettes that were not disclosed by manufacturers. 

The team discovered nearly 2,000 chemicals, including caffeine, three different industrial chemicals, and a pesticide. A vast majority of the chemicals found were unidentified. 

The researchers studied four popular brands: Juul, Vuse, Blu, and Mi-Salt. 

While vaping products come in hundreds of flavors, the team only examined tobacco-flavored vapes. 

Healthy Volunteers Needed to Participate in an Inpatient Shigella Challenge Study

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The Johns Hopkins CIR is looking for healthy volunteers to participate in an inpatient Shigella challenge study.  If you are between the ages of 18-50 you may be eligible to participate.  The study is 3 months or 9 months long and requires the following:

Healthy Volunteers Needed for Outpatient/Inpatient Oral Dosing Study to Protect against Dengue Virus

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The Johns Hopkins CIR is looking for healthy volunteers to participate in an outpatient/inpatient oral dosing study to protect against Dengue virus. If you are between the ages of 18-50 you may be eligible to participate. The study is 3 months long and requires the following:

Healthy Volunteers Needed for Inpatient Zika Investigational Vaccine Study

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The Johns Hopkins CIR is looking for healthy volunteers to participate in an inpatient Zika investigational vaccine study. If you are a female between the ages of 18-40 you may be eligible to participate. The study is 6 months long and requires the following:

Baltimore will administer COVID-19 booster shots starting the week of Sept. 20

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Baltimore City will administer COVID-19 vaccination booster shots starting the week of Sept. 20 in accordance with new CDC guidelines, city officials said Thursday.

Opioid use, fentanyl deaths spike amid pandemic

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Capital News Service – Preliminary data from 2020 reveals a dramatic increase in deaths linked with opioids in Maryland, particularly fentanyl; health officials blame the pandemic.

The number of unintentional intoxication overdoses — those involving all drugs and alcohol — rose 18.7% to 2,773 in 2020 from 2,379 in 2019, according to data collected by the Maryland Department of Health.

How Maryland is working to vaccinate its homeless population

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A Health Care for the Homeless worker vaccinates a patient on March 12, 2021. Health Care for the Homeless is a Baltimore-based organization working to end homelessness. Photo courtesy of the Maryland Department of Health

Capital News Service – On March 5, 2020, Maryland’s first three positive cases of COVID-19 were confirmed.

On March 30, 2020, Gov. Larry Hogan issued a stay-at-home order, keeping residents from work or school, and setting in motion a new normal for the state of pandemic-related anxiety to which the world is still accustomed.

On Dec. 11, the Food and Drug Administration approved the administration of the first coronavirus vaccine in the U.S., developed by Pfizer-BioNTech.

This month, on April 6, 2021, over a year from when the pandemic began, Hogan announced that all Marylanders over the age of 16 were eligible to receive a vaccine.

While the news gave the state its first true glimpse at a possible return to normalcy, some of the most vulnerable communities are still struggling to gain access to that same hope.

Individuals experiencing homelessness are one such population and are highlighted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as a “particularly vulnerable group” for COVID-19.

Get Ovary It: UMD program for free menstrual hygiene products receives student government association funding (VIDEO)

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Students at the University of Maryland created an organization to provide free menstrual hygiene products to the campus community, called Get Ovary It.

When their funding was pulled from the university, the Student Government Association came in to help.

 

 

Baltimore County follows Gov. Hogan’s lead on easing COVID restrictions, city does not

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Baltimore County Executive Johnny Olszewski

Baltimore County Executive Johnny Olszewski said Thursday that the county will align with Gov. Larry Hogan’s decision to significantly ease restrictions on outdoor and indoor dining, and large outdoor gatherings.

Meanwhile, a spokeswoman for Baltimore City Mayor Brandon Scott said public health indicators “do not warrant reopening at the governor’s pace at this time.”

Maryland General Assembly targets suicide prevention

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By Darryl Kinsey, Jr. and Callan Tansill-Suddath

Capital News Service – A rise in suicides and concerns about police interactions with those threatening to self-harm have prompted legislation in Maryland that would ease costs for certain treatment and require more training for law enforcement.

Other legislation would require the state to study and track an increase in the number of Marylanders taking their own lives.

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