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Maryland surpasses 3,000 coronavirus deaths as hospitalizations continue to decline

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This illustration, created at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), depicts the exterior structure of the coronavirus disease 2019, or COVID-19. Image courtesy of CDC.

Gov. Larry Hogan on Thursday said that Maryland is in a better position to deal with the coronavirus than most other states, but he reminded that the pandemic is not over.

“As we continue to safely reopen, it is important to remember that this crisis is still not behind us,” Hogan said. “More than 65,000 Marylanders have been infected, and more than 3,000 Marylanders have now lost their lives to this deadly virus. We mourn each and every loss.”

There have been 65,777 confirmed coronavirus cases in the state, while 433,182 people have tested negative as of Thursday morning, according to the Maryland Department of Health’s COVID-19 Case Map Dashboard.

Cohen partners with trauma experts for livestream series on healing

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“Truth & Healing: A Conversation Series” will be livestreamed on Healing City Baltimore’s Facebook page every Wednesday at 7 p.m. for the next nine weeks, starting tonight. Image courtesy of Healing City Baltimore.

A nine-week series of livestreamed conversations about trauma and healing will launch tonight as part of an effort to help Baltimoreans recover from racial injustice, the coronavirus pandemic and other traumatic events.

Councilman Zeke Cohen (District 1) has partnered with Dr. Melissa Buckley, a social worker and Coppin State University professor, and the organization Healing City Baltimore to create “Truth and Healing: A Conversation Series.”

Starting tonight, the conversations, hosted by Cohen and Buckley, will be livestreamed on Healing City Baltimore’s Facebook page at 7 p.m. every Wednesday for the next nine weeks.

How NBA vet Rex Chapman helped the Ouzo Bay video spread like wildfire

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Image via the Atlas Restaurant Group’s Facebook page.

On Monday night, after video from a Black woman showed her son being denied service at Ouzo Bay because of his attire, even though a white boy who was similarly dressed had just finished his meal, the restaurant’s owner, Atlas Restaurant Group, released a statement promising to change.

The company called the incident “disturbing” and pledged to revise its controversial dress code, which critics had already decried as racist, so it doesn’t apply to children age 12 and younger.

Atlas apologized to the woman who posted the video, Marcia Grant, and her son, Dallas, and said the manager seen enforcing the dress code had been placed on indefinite leave.

Maryland’s coronavirus hospitalizations decline for four straight weeks, down more than half in past month

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This is a picture of CDC’s laboratory test kit for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). CDC tests are provided to U.S. state and local public health laboratories, Department of Defense (DOD) laboratories and select international laboratories. Photo courtesy of CDC.

The number of Marylanders hospitalized for coronavirus has gone down for four straight weeks, decreasing by more than half over the past month, state data show.

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, 10,648 Marylanders who tested positive were hospitalized at some point, including 544 who are currently hospitalized. The number of hospitalizations has decreased for 28 straight days since reaching 1,338 on May 27.

Of the COVID-19 patients who are currently hospitalized, 331 are in acute care and 213 are in intensive care.

Dorsey introduces bill to rename Columbus obelisk to honor victims of police brutality

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Left to right, Abdul Salaam, Tawanda Jones, Marah O’Neal and Darlene Cain raise their fists as they stand in front of the Columbus Obelisk Monument in Herring Run Park Park in Northeast Baltimore. A bill sponsored by Councilman Ryan Dorsey (District 3) would rename the monument to honor victims of police violence. Photo by Marcus Dieterle.

As demonstrations across the United States draw attention to police brutality and racial injustice, many protesters have reignited the debate over the historical figures the country chooses to memorialize.

Some protests in response to the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Rayshard Brooks and others have included people toppling or defacing monuments for Confederate generals and soldiers who fought the Civil War to preserve slavery. Those post-war tributes are associated with larger systems of white supremacy, protesters have argued, and that’s why they have to come down.

In some cases, memorials to some of the country’s most significant figures, like George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, have been targeted because those men were slaveholders.

Against the backdrop of those ongoing and overlapping discussions, Councilman Ryan Dorsey (District 3) last night introduced a bill to rededicate one of three monuments in the city for explorer Christopher Columbus–an obelisk in Northeast Baltimore’s Herring Run Park– as the Police Violence Victims Monument.

Maryland surpasses 65,000 confirmed COVID-19 cases

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This illustration, created at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), depicts the exterior structure of the coronavirus disease 2019, or COVID-19. Image courtesy of CDC.

Maryland surpassed 65,000 confirmed coronavirus cases, with state officials reporting at least 65,007 positive cases as of Tuesday morning. At least 418,528 tests have come back negative.

The state has reported 10,360 COVID-19 test results in the past 24 hours, totaling 583,091 tests since the pandemic began, according to the Maryland Department of Health’s COVID-19 Case Map Dashboard.

Baltimore County announces deal to secure COVID-19 testing materials

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The Baltimore County Courthouse. Photo by James G. Howes, via Wikipedia.

Baltimore County reached a deal with local company Becton, Dickinson and Company to purchase coronavirus testing supplies, a development officials said would ramp up the county’s testing ability over the coming weeks and months.

A division of the Sparks-based medical technology company, BD Integrated Diagnostic Solutions, will supply 2,000 test kits per week with the swabs and vials needed to collect samples.

Maryland’s average rate of new cases, deaths trending downward

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This is a picture of CDC’s laboratory test kit for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). CDC tests are provided to U.S. state and local public health laboratories, Department of Defense (DOD) laboratories and select international laboratories. Photo courtesy of CDC.

The average number of newly reported coronavirus cases and deaths in Maryland are declining, state data show.

At least 64,603 Marylanders have tested positive for COVID-19, while 410,122 have tested negative as of Monday morning, according to the Maryland Department of Health’s COVID-19 Case Map Dashboard.

Hogan to allow limited outdoor visitation at nursing homes, require retesting of staff and residents

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The FutureCare – Lochearn nursing home in Northwest Baltimore. Image via Google Street View.

Families will be able to visit their loved ones outside of nursing homes this weekend as long as those facilities have no active cases and haven’t had any for two weeks, Gov. Larry Hogan announced today.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has required all of us to make incredible sacrifices, including being unable to visit family members and loved ones in nursing homes,” Hogan said in a statement. “As our state continues on the road to recovery, this Father’s Day weekend we are able to begin safely allowing outdoor visits to certain nursing homes.”

Pride Center of Maryland announces departure of executive director, citing desire for ‘new direction’

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The Pride Center of Maryland, a community organization for sexual and gender minorities, on Tuesday announced the departure of their executive director, Mimi Demissew. Photo courtesy of Pride Center of Maryland.

The Pride Center of Maryland on Tuesday announced the departure of executive director Mimi Demissew, who had served in the role since 2016.

Merrick Moses, president of the center’s board of directors, told Baltimore Fishbowl on Thursday that he “can’t really go into the specifics” of Demissew’s departure but that the board “decided it was time for the Pride Center to go in a new direction.”

“It’s a new day at the Pride Center and we decided to move forward,” Moses said.

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