Tag: baltimore museum of art

Sex and subtext in the BMA’s ‘Monsters & Myths: Surrealism and War’ exhibit

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Max Ernst’s “Europe After the Rain II.” Image courtesy of the Baltimore Museum of Art.

Recognizable in the corrosive oranges and reds of “Europe After the Rain II” is the unforgiving desert landscape of Sedona, Arizona, where Max Ernst lived as a refugee for years after fleeing Nazi-occupied France. The 1942 painting, a bombed-out widescreen of radioactive rubble currently on display as part of the Baltimore Museum of Art’s “Monsters & Myths: Surrealism and War” exhibition, shows two mutated figures standing among a heap of coral-colored, crushed bones and gazing off into the horizon, frozen by the impossibility–and necessity–of imagining a future.

War is an insistent presence in the exhibit, which frames Salvador Dali, Pablo Picasso, Andre Masson and Ernst as interpreters of a violent century, unable to forget what they saw. But it’s far from the only one. There’s also sadomasochism, cybernetic anxieties and at least one castration fantasy embedded in this slice of the surrealist canon, most of which flies under the radar of the BMA’s cataloging.

‘John Waters: Indecent Exposure’ highlights the auteur’s intellectual savvy

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Image courtesy of the Baltimore Museum of Art.

She Shoulda Said ‘No!’ was a 1949 exploitation film in the “Reefer Madness” mold, designed to warn red-blooded, young Americans about the moral rot, social deviancy and sexual degeneracy that comes with using drugs. In it, a young woman’s experiments with weed lead her into a wayward spiral of selling drugs, losing her job and promiscuity, her moral downfall pushing her brother to suicide. Only after cleaning up in jail and collaborating with authorities can she right her way in life.

Event Pick: Amy Sherald discusses her portraiture at the BMA tonight

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Thelma Golden, left, and Amy Sherald. Image via the Baltimore Museum of Art.

Local artist Amy Sherald’s portrait of Michelle Obama attracted admirers and strong critics soon after it was unveiled. The latter group complained the portrait didn’t really look like the former first lady. But criticism is subjective, and the general public has been voting with its feet: In February, the National Portrait Gallery reported attendance was up 300 percent, with lines as long as 90 minutes to see the portraits of Barack and Michelle Obama.

BMA appoints Paula Hayes to be its first-ever landscape artist-in-residence

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The Levi Sculpture Garden at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Photo courtesy of the museum.

Artist Paula Hayes will soon be reimagining the 7.5 acres of idyllic Wyman Park grounds that house the Baltimore Museum of Art.

Amy Sherald, Painter of Michelle Obama’s Much-Awaited Portrait, to Join BMA’s Board

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Ms. Everything, by Amy Sherald (courtesy Smithsonian)

Baltimore artist Amy Sherald, known for her life-sized, high-contrast portraits of African-Americans – most recently that of first lady Michelle Obama, to be unveiled next month – will be joining the Baltimore Museum of Art’s board of trustees in February.

The BMA Presents New Exhibition by Internationally Acclaimed Artist Tomás Saraceno

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Photography by Vanhaerents Art Collection, © 2016

The Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA) has commissioned a major new work by internationally acclaimed artist Tomás Saraceno for an exhibition that will dramatically change the East Lobby and several galleries.

Prominent Artist, Baltimore City Delegate Among BMA’s Seven New Trustees

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Courtesy BMA

The Baltimore Museum of Art has added seven new trustees to its board, including a policy analyst and congressman’s wife, a Baltimore City delegate and a nationally known contemporary artist.

The BMA’s Front Room Now Features the Work of NY Artist Adam Pendleton – Examining the Freedom of Abstraction in Relationship to Language, Politics and Identity

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Front Room: Adam Pendleton

Now on Exhibit at the BMA

From March 26, 2017 — October 1, 2017

Adam Pendleton (American, b. 1984) is a New York-based artist whose work examines and questions the freedom of abstraction in relationship to language, politics, and identity. The animating force of his work is found in Black Dada—the artist’s term for a broad conceptualization of blackness.

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