Tag: farmers markets

The Rack: Rotunda Kicks Off New Weekly Farmer’s Market

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Jones Family Farm at Rotunda Farmer’s Market

The Rotunda kicked off its new weekly farmer’s market yesterday, to the delight of neighbors in nearby Hampden and Roland Park.

Blacksauce Kitchen and the JFX Farmers Market

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COTD

catch of the day fish (2)Admittedly, we’ve spent the last few weeks focusing on all things related to the spring holidays. Easter and Passover coincide this year, so it seems like everyone’s atwitter with plans for gathering, visiting, and feasting with friends and loved ones this weekend. And we’re fully behind that. But if neither Easter nor Passover is really a thing for you, there is a certain way in which you’re at an advantage. Because this weekend, you can head down, unfettered, to the JFX farmers’ market and get your fill of incredible food from Blacksauce Kitchen. And there probably won’t even be a line.

Baltimoreans Are Not Healthy, But at Least We Have Pools and Parks, Study Says

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Baltimore has 24.6 farmers' markets per 1,000,000 residents, more than twice the national average.
Baltimore has 24.6 farmers’ markets per 1,000,000 residents, more than twice the national average.

We’ve just gone ahead and curved the results of the American College of Sports and Medicine’s “American fitness index.” Even with a generous 21.8 points added (because Minneapolis-St. Paul, the fittest city in the country, scored just 78.2 out of 100 possible points), Baltimore scores an underwhelming 81.3, or a B-minus. The upside? We’re much, much healthier than Detroit!

CSAs from Local Farmers

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CSAa

catch of the day fish (2)Garrison Keillor (whom we consider a trustworthy source on most things) once quipped that , “sex is good, but not as good as fresh, sweet corn.” We’re not sure exactly where we come down on that one, but certainly there are times when it’s a tight race. And now that the ground has thawed and things are beginning to bloom, you may want to consider reserving your weekly allotment of fresh, sweet everything from one of the many local farms that offer season-long Community Supported Agriculture shares, or “CSAs.” If you live in Baltimore, there are plenty of options for joining a CSA, including One Straw Farm—providing sustainable produce with a responsible ecological footprint, and whose booth at the farmer’s market is always packed with interesting varieties and tons of shoppers. Other options include the Real Food Farm, and 5 Seeds Farm & Apiary.

A Farmer’s Market Every Day of the Week

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Photo of Hidden Harvest Farm by Ami Dang

Potential disaster alert:  It’s Tuesday in Baltimore and you’ve run out of kale. Lucky for you, there’s no need to wait until the weekend to re-stock your kitchen with produce from local farms. Baltimore has an abundance of farmer’s markets in all parts of the city, on all days of the week. Our roundup of a week’s worth of fresh produce is below. Got a favorite we didn’t mention? Let us know in the comments.

"Maryland Harvest" Shines Spotlight on Region’s Locavore Movement

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Just when you thought you knew everything about the local food movement, a locally produced documentary, “The Maryland Harvest,” brings more to light. Produced by internationally recognized, Baltimore-based, Houpla, Inc., a colorful and tantalizing one-hour documentary previewed Friday night to a standing-room only audience at uber-local venue, The Woman’s Club of Roland Park. 

Scheduled for broadcast Tuesday, April 17 at 9 p.m. on MPT, the program shows the intimate, working relationship and mouth-watering creations jointly produced by Maryland farmers and top Maryland chefs, including Baltimore’s Cindy Wolf, Spike Gjerde, John Shields and Nancy Longo. Chefs work with crops that farmers already grow and suggest others. Farmers in turn bring new ideas to the chefs, in an ongoing creative process of reinventing Maryland cuisine. According to the program, Maryland cuisine is considered among the top five in the U.S. Who knew?

Shown Friday night was the spring segment, where ingredients like freshly cut asparagus, grown by Tom Godfrey of Godfrey’s Farm in Queen Anne’s County, and English peas, grown by neighboring Tom’s Farm, are turned into an artistic English pea risotto with asparagus sauce by Cindy Wolf. 

Along with producer/director duo Brooke McDonald and husband Michael Brassert, on hand for the preview was co-producer/director and host, food and wine expert Al Spoler as well as Spike Gjerde of Woodberry Kitchen and radio-host-turned-farmer Steve Rouse. (Remember him from “Rouse & Company?”) Using organic practices at his Rousedale Farms, Rouse says demand for local crops is strong. With 200 chickens, he sells 300 dozen eggs per month, in addition to seasonal vegetables like flavorful heirloom tomatoes. “If we had 50 acres, I could sell everything,” he said.

Spike and his hardworking Woodberry staff are shown in the program preparing and freezing fresh rhubarb pickle for winter use. They pickle, preserve and can locally grown fruit and vegetables. “Can we feed ourselves?” asks Spike. “That is the question.”

With news that Spike is expanding his operation to include both a café and a take-out shop, it’s clear that Baltimore locovores are on the rise.  A survey taken after the segment previewed Friday also showed an audience more interested in the local food movement.

Hungrier too, judging from the stampede upstairs to the food tables where attorney-musician Paul Snyder added jazzy flavor to a tasty Friday evening.

Watch the teaser for Maryland Harvest. 

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