Tag: department of natural resources

Highly Invasive Snails from New Zealand Found in Baltimore County

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Photo by Michal Maňas, via Wikimedia Commons

Good news! Maryland’s got a new snail. The bad news: it’s highly invasive and could throw off entire aquatic ecosystems around the state.

Maryland Cuts Crabbing Season 10 Days Shorter Due to Drop in Crustacean Population

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As a precautionary measure, state officials have implemented a new rule for crabbing season this year: “No harvest of female hard crabs after November 20, 2017.”

Deer With Jar Stuck on His Head Running Around Harford County

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Courtesy Christopher Beauchamp/WBAL-TV

A deer in Harford County is in a tough spot after trying just a bit too hard to get a lick of salt.

Unusual Discovery in Dundalk Yields Body of Manatee

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Courtesy Maryland Department of Natural Resources
Courtesy Maryland Department of Natural Resources

Normally it’s a lucky day when you spot a manatee in Maryland waters, though it probably doesn’t bode well for the animal if it’s this late in the year. Someone in Dundalk had that recent misfortunate when they stumbled across a manatee that had passed away and was left stranded.

Black Bear Spotted in Baltimore County

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NRP officer poses with a bear in the background
NRP officer poses with a bear in the background

A black bear visited a pair of picnickers in Baltimore County over the weekend, Fox Baltimore reports.

Put Down That Herring!

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Maryland, along with some other east coast states, has issued a moratorium on the harvest of the blueback herring and alewife, known collectively as “river herring.”

River herring populations have dropped drastically along the east coast since at least the 1980s. States from Maine to Florida were told to ban all herring fishing if they couldn’t develop a plan for the sustainable harvest of the declining species by January 1. Apparently, we didn’t get it together in time.

From now on, if you’re caught using river herring as bait, make sure you can prove you bought it from New York, Maine, New Hampshire, or the Carolinas, all of which have not been required to shut down their fisheries.

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