Tag: public transit

Please Don’t Charge $1 For the Charm City Circulator

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Charm-City-Circulator-bus-01
When it first launched in 2010, the Charm City Circulator linked Penn Station, the Inner Harbor, Fort McHenry, and Harbor East through its free bus service. It was aimed at helping tourists explore the city, but plenty of regular folks–myself included–were happy to use the service as well. Which was totally fine — there was no limit or regulation to who could ride the free buses. Which some city councilmembers seem to see as a problem.

Baltimore Public Transit Gets a Little Worse as 3 Light Rail Stations Close

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Photo via Wikipedia
Photo via Wikipedia

If you rely on the Mount Washington, Cold Spring, or Woodberry light rail stations to get around town, consider this your fair warning — the city has decided to close all three stations for emergency repairs starting on Friday.

The culprit? Erosion. Which, as you may remember, caused a leetle transit problem last month, as an entire city block collapsed. Heavy rains in the Baltimore area have made already-existing erosion problems even worse, and the city determined that it was better to deal with the problem now rather than wait for another disaster. To put things in perspective: The 26th Street collapse will cost around $18.5 million to repair, while these preemptive light rail fixes will add up to only about $1.5 million. That’s why we fix things before they fall apart.

Japan Wants to Lend U.S. $4B for a D.C.-Balto.-New York Super Train

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via Business Insider
via Business Insider

It would cost at least $8 billion to build a subterranean railway that would connect Washington, Baltimore, and New York City. But the Mag Lev Super Train that would ride on it would travel at speeds of up to 311 mph. That means D.C. to Baltimore in 15 minutes, Baltimore to New York in just 45.

Luckily Japan’s prime minister has offered to lend us half the money! I say, let’s do it. Maybe it would effectively turn Baltimore into a borough of New York, and that might not be exactly what we want, but it may be as close to a teleportation device as we’re going to get. Plus, the nose on this kind of train looks crazy!

Would You Ride a Water Taxi in Winter?

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water-taxi

For some, the Inner Harbor’s Water Taxi boats are an icon of summer in Baltimore, but owner Michael McDaniel wants to convince Baltimoreans to get out on the water year round.

And to drum up business in the off-season he’s offering a pretty wicked deal. For the standard fee of a $7 to $12 roundtrip, you can order up a boat to pick you up and take you to any one of the 17 Harbor Connector stops. McDaniel says you may wait as little as five minutes.

MARC Train (Finally!) Adds Weekend Service Between DC and Baltimore

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Photo by Flickr user grant_j
Photo by Flickr user grant_j

I’ve always thought that Baltimore was the perfect distance from DC — close enough that I can just hop on the train to check out an exciting exhibit in the nation’s capital, but far enough away that I don’t run into politicians (or, worse, wannabe politicians) at the bar. The one fly in the ointment has been the lack of weekend MARC trains, which force weekend visitors between the cities to either drive (time-consuming and annoying) or take the Amtrak (more than twice as expensive). But not for long!

The MTA Bus Line So Unreliable That One Rider Put Up “Missing” Posters

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mta-route-27

On weekdays, the MTA Route 27 bus runs every 20 minutes from roughly 4:30 a.m. to 2:45 a.m. between the Reisterstown Plaza subway station and Port Covington, with stops in Hampden, Remington, Station North, downtown, and a few other locations. Or at least, it’s supposed to do that. But for frequent riders of the line, it’s matchless unreliability has become legendary. People who’ve had to deal with it on the regular tend to type in all caps when answering questions about it. For real.

Baltimore playwright Lola Pierson took the 27 in her high school days, but after one too many times waiting in vain, she gave up and started walking her route instead. “The 27 wouldn’t come for like an hour, and then three in a row would come!” Pierson recalls. “Plus, they would do route alterations and not tell you, so you’d end up somewhere totally crazy with no way to get home.”

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