Tag: The Associated

Navigating Anxiety As Our World Opens Up

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Parenting is Playing the Long Game

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A More Just and Equitable World

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Supporting Our Community During the COVID-19 Pandemic

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Breaking Down Barriers and Learning About Neighbors

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Tikvah Womack was preparing for a Shabbaton at her synagogue when Rina Goloskov reached out to her with an idea she wanted to discuss about making their community stronger.

Both women live in Northwest Baltimore, in diverse neighborhoods of African American, Jewish and Latinx families. Both are Orthodox Jews, while Womack is also a Woman of Color.

Rina, said Womack, was concerned about the fact that many of the community members had little relationship with neighbors who were not similar to them.

“We both felt that we wanted to build bridges and create understanding. Yet we knew we had to begin by breaking down the barriers,” recalls Womack.

Together, with the support of CHAI, The Associated agency that focuses on strengthening Northwest Baltimore neighborhoods, they created a four-part dialogue series that engaged Orthodox and African American women living in CHAI’s five city neighborhoods.

Book Suggestions That Help You Talk to Your Children about Race and Multi-culturalism

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This has been quite a month! As the weather turns nicer, time outside can be just what we need to lift our spirits.

And yet, in the past few days, as we turn on the news, scroll through social media, or even just look out our doors, we are filled with images of illness, racism and injustice.

You may be wondering how to talk about this with your children. It can be challenging for parents, grandparents and teachers when we do not have all the answers. We may stumble over our words; we may feel we do not have the right language. This is ok! But our children need us to be role models, to talk with them in age appropriate ways, and to help them see their neighbors of all races and ethnicities as friends. It is our job to make sure that our children embrace difference and reject racism.

Our goal at PJ Library remains the same as it always has- to help families raise thoughtful, caring and engaged Jewish children. This month PJ Library subscribers will receive books relating to kindness, mitzvot and making the world a better place.

Exploring History Through Jewish Museum of Maryland’s Online Database

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The coronavirus pandemic has caused us to reevaluate our options for entertainment, work and social interactions. As we continue to cope in different ways, many of us have seized the opportunity to relive family moments by sharing old photographs and retelling personal stories, leaving us thinking about our past, present and future.

And for those left wanting more, the Jewish Museum of Maryland (JMM) is guaranteed to pique one’s interest in the history of Maryland and the Jewish people. Storytellers at heart, JMM curates 12,000 objects, more than 68,000 photographs, 850 oral histories, two historic synagogues and three exhibit galleries. They find new stories all the time — stories that will make you question, make you laugh, make you think and feel deeply—no matter who you are. From poignant to whimsical, comfortably familiar to downright bizarre, they are able to find, tell and protect the stories of Maryland’s Jewish communities.

It’s easy to search and find any story, photo or object using JMM’s online collections database. Typing in keywords, such as a year (1960), a historical period (the civil war) or a place (Lombard Street) generates photos and information on any given subject.

This can provide a deeper dive into our shared history as well as expand one’s knowledge base. Below you can see the full range of abilities the online collections database offers as Tracie Guy-Decker, the Deputy Director of the Jewish Museum of Maryland, walks you through its features.

“If you just want to see something fun you can always click on ‘random images.’  Then you get a whole bunch of images from our collections [and] some things you might never expect.”

JCC Announces Initial Reopening Plans

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As Maryland completes Phase One of Governor Larry Hogan’s plan to reopen businesses previously shuttered in response to the coronavirus, the JCC announced it will begin offering select recreational programs to its members.

Adhering to the most stringent local and safety protocols, beginning this June, the JCC will provide outdoor fitness activities on a limited basis at the Rosenbloom Owings Mills JCC campus. This includes group fitness classes, personal training and individual workouts.

All fitness activities will be open to members over the age of 16 and held under shaded structures on the JCC’s outdoor fields to provide ample space for social distancing.

The J operations team also is gearing up to open the Aquatics Park in the coming weeks with all health and safety protocols in place.

Pearlstone Reinvents Itself in the Wake of the Coronavirus Pandemic

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When the coronavirus pandemic virus hit, Pearlstone’s business was booming. Sales from its Retreat Center were growing exponentially, as was its in-person experiential learning opportunities that focused on Living Judaism, like immersive holiday celebrations and Family Farm Camp.

Yet in March, things would suddenly change. The hospitality business was hit hard. So was programming. As the community stayed home and practiced social distancing, it was up to the imagination and innovation from Pearlstone’s professionals and volunteers, combined with the support of The Associated, that led to a reenvisioning of the organization’s work.

 “We began to think about how we could sustain Pearlstone and be of service to the community until things began to return to normal,” said Jakir Manela, chief executive officer of Pearlstone. “And we asked ourselves, as people yearn for nature and connection, how can we do that with everyone’s health and safety in mind. We knew we had to pivot, adapt and reinvent.”

In keeping with Pearlstone’s core values of Living Judaism, Connectedness, and Loving Warmth, the agency began to rethink its role. Going beyond virtual experiences, which included adding new programs like “Let’s Get Cooking” and “Grow Your Own” (for budding gardeners), Pearlstone began to reimagine.

That led to an organizational commitment to build on the agency’s strengths. As a result, Pearlstone has created dynamic, new strategies for community impact during these difficult times.

“Although the crisis has hit Pearlstone like a tsunami, our ability to adapt, and our partnership with The Associated and its leaders are helping us through this crisis,” says Manela. “We are blessed to have our leaders.”

Click here for full article.

Joe Uddeme Discusses Volunteering through “Bunches of Lunches”

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For Joe Uddeme, a Pikesville High Alum and member of Jewish Baltimore, being able to give directly to the community is vital.

“If you look around the world, you know that people need help everywhere – in Europe. In Africa. In the United States,” says Joe. “People in our own backyard need help. If we can help those people, it’s my belief that communities will start to prosper and when that happens, things start to grow.”

Joe sees volunteerism as a way to impact a community directly, sometimes in ways that financial contributions cannot. It’s something he has been doing for the past 20 years, and it’s what led him to the Bunches of Lunches Program, a meal delivery program that began as a partnership between Jewish Volunteer Connection (JVC) and Krieger Schechter Day School (KSDS). Today, it now includes Beth El Congregation, which became a partner when the program became community-wide on April 27.

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